ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE



The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
© 1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration

description

  1. FCCPT PILOTING EXPEDITED SERVICE

    by , 10-17-2014 at 09:45 AM (Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration)
    by Chris Musillo

    The Foreign Credentialing Commission on Physical Therapy is launching a pilot program, offering expedited completion of reviews. The Expedited Service program guarantees completion within six weeks.The reviews have traditionally taken eight weeks.An Expedited Service can be requested at any time prior to the start of a review and up to two weeks after the start of the review.

    Read the Musillo Unkenholt Healthcare and Immigration Law Blog at www.musillo.com or www.ilw.com. You can also visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  2. NOVEMBER 2014 VISA BULLETIN

    by , 10-10-2014 at 08:44 AM (Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration)
    by Chris Musillo

    The Department of State has just released the November 2014 Visa Bulletin. This is the second Visa Bulletin of the 2015 US Fiscal Year, which began October 1, 2014.

    The Philippines EB-3 yet has again had a substantial progression. It is now at June 2012, which is a five year jump since March 2014. It remains consistent with the All Other (ROW) EB-3 date.

    India EB-2 had a dramatic retrogression, moving from May 2009 all the way back to February 2005. India EB-3 remains stuck in November 2003.

    The Chinese EB-3 number continued to move dramatically and inconsistently. It is now at January 2010 and is more favorable than China EB-3.

    The Visa Bulletin also included this projection:

    EMPLOYMENT-based categories (potential monthly movement)

    Employment First: Current

    Employment Second:
    Worldwide: Current
    China: Three to five weeks
    India: No forward movement
    Employment Third:
    Worldwide: Continued rapid forward movement for the next several months. After such rapid advance of the cut-off date applicant demand for number use, particularly for adjustment of status cases, is expected to increase significantly. Once such demand begins to materialize at a greater rate it will impact this cut-off date situation.
    China: Rapid forward movement. Such movement is likely to result in increased demand which may require "corrective" action possibly as early as February.
    India: Little if any movement
    Mexico: Will remain at the worldwide date
    Philippines: Will remain at the worldwide date. Increased demand may require "corrective" action at some point later in the fiscal year.

    Employment- Based All Other CHINA - mainland born INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES
    1st C C C C C
    2nd C 08DEC09 15FEB05 C C
    3rd 01JUN12 01JAN10 22NOV03 01JUN12 01JUN12


    Read the Musillo Unkenholt Healthcare and Immigration Law Blog at www.musillo.com or www.ilw.com. You can also visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  3. FSBPT ELIMINATING DISTINCTION BETWEEN GENERAL EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

    by , 10-09-2014 at 09:16 AM (Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration)
    by Chris Musillo

    Starting November 1, 2014, the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy (FSBPT) will eliminate the distinction between General Education and Professional Education. This is a modification of the Interpretive Guidelines for the FSBPT Coursework Tool (CWT).

    The Coursework Tool accepted by all member boards to evaluate whether a foreign educated PT or PTA’s education is substantially equivalent to a US PT or PTA education.

    FSBPT’s Board issued a comprehensive notice letting the public know that the Board “did not approve this change lightly”. The Board explained that the elimination of the distinction had been considered for several years and had been recommended by the FSBPT’s Foreign Educated Standards Committee. Notably, within US education and within the criteria developed by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), there is no such term as general education. The new policy does not to eliminate the required courses within General Education, but it does eliminate the artificial distinction between Professional Education and General Education.

    For foreign-educated PTs, this change could be helpful. Presently the CWT requires 150 total credits, which is comparable to what is needed for a US post-graduate degree. In many international PT programs these general courses are embedded into the PT professional courses, not completed ahead of entry. The current model would not allow the evaluator to give credit as a general course since it was taken as part of their professional coursework.

    Previously, some foreign-educated PTs education was found to be incomparable to a US-educated because of the distinction between Professional Education and General Education. This resulted in some foreign-educated PTs having to take “make-up” classes, usually from CLEP. As the Board correctly points out, “to ask an applicant to complete a prerequisite after completing professional curriculum seems counterintuitive, and sets up an unreasonable barrier to licensure.”


    Read the Musillo Unkenholt Healthcare and Immigration Law Blog at www.musillo.com or www.ilw.com. You can also visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

    Updated 10-09-2014 at 10:37 AM by CMusillo

  4. AILA AUDIO CLE ON NURSES AND ALLIED HEALTH

    by , 10-06-2014 at 02:43 PM (Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration)
    by Chris Musillo

    The AILA Education Department has scheduled an audio seminar for Thursday, October 9, 2014 @ 2:00 pm (Eastern Time) entitled “Petitions for Nurses and Allied Healthcare Workers.” MU Law’s Chris Musillo is the Moderator of this audio seminar. Chris’ co-speakers are with Tiffany Baldwin and Carl Shusterman.

    The audio seminar will include these topics:

    • H-1B for Nurses: 2002 and 2014 USCIS Memorandum
    • Using Schedule A for Nurses and Physical Therapists
    • EB-2 Consideration for Healthcare Worker
    • USCIS Reliance on the EDGE Database in Evaluation of Foreign Education
    • The Role of State Licensing and Credentialing in H-1B and PERM Cases
    • Drafting Immigrant Visa Applications for Roving Healthcare Workers
    • Visa Screen: Who Needs It and Why?


    The panel has reserved 30 minutes for Questions and Answers at the conclusion of the presentation.

    Read the Musillo Unkenholt Healthcare and Immigration Law Blog at www.musillo.com or www.ilw.com. You can also visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  5. MASSACHUSETTS PUTS OUT THE WELCOME MAT FOR H-1B WORKERS

    by , 10-01-2014 at 01:25 PM (Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration)
    by Chris Musillo

    The State of Massachusetts has hit upon an ingenious plan to widen the path for H-1B workers and employers, as reported by CNN/Money. By using the H-1B “concurrent” employer program and coupling it with the H-1B “cap exemption” for Universities, Massachusetts will help foreign entrepreneurs obtain H-1B visas to work in Massachusetts.

    The plan appears to work like this: the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative will vet prospective H-1B entrepreneurs. When an innovative entrepreneur is identified, the Collaborative will find a Massachusetts University to sponsor the H-1B worker under the “cap exemption” rule. This rule says that an H-1B worker who is sponsored by a University is not subject to the H-1B lottery.

    Because there is no set required number of hours that the H-1B worker must be employed at the University, the expectation is that the H-1B worker will only work 8-10 hours per week at the University.

    Presumably, the H-1B start-up will then sponsor the H-1B worker for a “concurrent” H-1B visa. The H-1B employee will spend the rest of the work-week employed by the start-up.

    Without the assistance of the University, the plan would not work because the start-up’s H-1B sponsorship would normally be subject to the H-1B lottery. The plan is an elegant and creative one to deal with an outdated H-1B cap.

    There is no reason that Massachusetts has to limit this plan to entrepreneurs. It could also be used to help fill critically short healthcare occupations.

    Read the Musillo Unkenholt Healthcare and Immigration Law Blog at www.musillo.com or www.ilw.com. You can also visit us onFacebook and follow us on Twitter.
Page 51 of 142 FirstFirst ... 41495051525361101 ... LastLast
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: