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I-9 E-Verify Immigration Compliance

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  1. What is Unfair Documentary Practices?

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

    Click image for larger version. 

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    In yesterday’s blog, http://blogs.ilw.com/entry.php?10251...ocessing-Plant, I discussed Washington Potato Company reaching a settlement agreement with the Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER) of the Justice Department related to its unfair documentary practices of requesting work-authorized non-U.S. citizens to present specific documents to confirm their status, while not subjecting U.S. citizens to such requests.

    In today’s blog, I will discuss more about unfair documentary practices. Unfair documentary practices was formerly referred to as document abuse. It refers to discriminatory practices related to the verification of employment eligibility in the Form I-9 process. Employers that treat individuals differently based on national origin or citizenship commit unfair documentary practices when they engage in one of four types of activity: 1) Improperly requesting that employees produce more documentation than is required to show identity and employment authorization; 2) Improperly asking employees to produce a particular document to show identity or employment eligibility; 3) Improperly rejecting documents that appear to be genuine and be-longing to the employee; and 4) Improperly treating groups of applicants differently (for example, based on looking or sounding foreign) when they complete Forms I-9.

    The following are examples of prohibited practices when they are based on an employee’s “national origin’ or “citizenship or immigration status”:


    • Setting different employment eligibility verification standards or requiring different documents based on national origin or citizen-ship status;
    • Requesting to see employment eligibility verification documents before hire and completing the Form I-9 because an employee appears foreign or the employee indicates that he or she is not a U.S. citizen;
    • Refusing to accept a document or to hire an individual because an acceptable document has a future expiration date;
    • Limiting jobs to U.S. citizens, unless a job is limited to citizens by law or regulation;
    • Asking to see a document with an employee’s “Alien” or “Admission number” when completing Section 1 of Form I-9; and
    • Asking a lawful permanent resident to re-verify employment eligibility because the person’s green card has expired.


    For more information on avoiding unfair documentary practices and many other issues related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
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