ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
© 1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

I-9 E-Verify Immigration Compliance

description

  1. How to Get Ready for ICE Audit? (part 1)

    By Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BOOK.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	4.8 KB 
ID:	1236

    As I stated in my blog entry on October 19, 2017, Tom Homan, Acting Director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), announced an increase of I-9 Inspections/Audits "by four to five times." What can employers do to decrease their vulnerability to significant penalties if one is audited? There are two things to do which go hand in hand – implement an immigration compliance policy and conduct an internal I-9 audit. This blog will focus on drafting and implementing an immigration compliance policy. Part 2 will focus on conducting an internal I-9 audit.

    As an immigration attorney who represents lots of companies in immigration compliance matters, one of the first questions I ask a new client is whether they have a written immigration compliance policy. Unfortunately, a vast majority of the companies say no or point to one paragraph in their employee manual.

    Why should a company have an immigration compliance policy? There are many reasons but one of the most important is to identify the person in charge of immigration compliance. It’s amazing how often that simple question is met with uncertainty. As we all know, if someone does not take ownership over a policy that policy will flounder.

    Here are other items that should be in an immigration compliance policy:
    1. Determine whether copies of documents should be retained;
    2. Determine whether the company should use E-Verify;
    3. Determine if the company is required by state or federal law to use E-Verify or FAR E-Verify;
    4. Zero tolerance policy for employment of individuals who cannot comply with work authorization rules;
    5. Timing and procedures for regular internal I-9 audits to be conducted;
    6. Rules on which management has access to I-9 records;
    7. How often is training required for employer representatives, who are completing I-9 forms;
    8. Define the required retention policy of I-9 forms – 1 year from employee’s termination or 3 years from original hire, whichever is longer;
    9. Rules for working with outside contractors;
    10. Re-verification procedures for employees with Employment Authorization documents;
    11. Set protocols for interacting with government officials if ICE or another federal agency shows up at worksite; and
    12. Policy on no discrimination of applicants/employees based on their lawful immigration status – citizenship, permanent resident, etc. or national origin.

    For more information on implementing an immigration compliance policy and how to conduct an internal I-9 audit in advance of an ICE inspection, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  2. H-1B Site Visits Will Be Increasing

    By: Bruce R. Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law PLLC

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	detective.jpg 
Views:	7 
Size:	3.1 KB 
ID:	1235

    Due to a report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the USCIS plans to substantially increase their H-1B site visits. On October 27, 2017, the OIG issued a report - “USCIS Needs a Better Approach to Verify H-1B Visa Participants” where it made four recommendations, all which USCIS said it would strive to achieve.

    The OIG report made these findings:
    1. USCIS does not track their site visits as to the type of visa category the visit pertains;
    2. USCIS does not assess the information it collects from site visits;
    3. USCIS is to conduct site visits, that will target – a) employers where basic business information cannot be verified; b) employers who are H-1B dependent; and c) employers who place beneficiaries offsite;
    4. USCIS should deny new petitions for an employer, which has recurring violators;
    5. USCIS should revoke petitions, where site visits are unverified; and
    6. Immigration Officers are not all trained and site visits are not conducted on a uniform basis.
    OIG’s four recommendations are:
    1. USCIS should develop a process to collect and analyze all data collected from an H-1B site visit, including tracking the information and the program costs. USCIS also needs to analyze adjudicative actions for unverified site visits, and use the data collected to develop performance measures to assess the effectiveness of the site visit program;
    2. USCIS should identify data and assessments through the site visits and share it with external stakeholders;
    3. USCIS needs to identify where resources need to go for the site visit program, including adjusting the number of required site visits and time and effort spent; updating policies, procedures, and training so that site visits are conducted efficiently and uniformly; streamlining the employers visited and applying a risk-based approach; providing Immigration Officers a career path so that they do not leave; and
    4. USCIS should develop comprehensive policies to ensure that adjudicative action is prioritized on fraudulent or noncompliant petitions.
    Employers should be ready for more H-1B site visits. To be ready, an employer should:
    1. Have a system in place if USCIS shows up for site visit, which includes calling their attorney;
    2. Designate a contact or contacts to handle USCIS site visits;
    3. Ask for and record the credentials and contact information of the USCIS official;
    4. Keep copies of the public access files in a location where they can be accessed quickly;
    5. If unsure of an answer to a question posed by the USCIS official, ask for additional time and offer to follow-up; and
    6. At the end of the site visit, write down a detailed report, including questions USCIS asked.
    For more information on other immigration compliance topics I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  3. Massachusetts restaurateur sentenced for multiple fraud schemes

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law PLLC


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	handcuffs (37).jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	14.7 KB 
ID:	1234

    A restaurant owner, Hazrat Khalid Khan, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and one year of supervised release in federal court in Boston for committing tax and insurance fraud involving 11 Boston-area restaurants, and for committing visa and immigration fraud. Also, he will be subject to deportation proceedings upon completion of his sentence. Khan was ordered to pay restitution of $2,343,155 to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and $27,863 to two insurance companies he defrauded. The sentencing follows a multiagency investigation, which included Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

    In April 2017, Khan pleaded guilty to conspiring to defraud the IRS, failing to collect and pay over taxes, committing mail fraud, making false statements on a naturalization application, and committing visa fraud.

    Khan was the partial owner of 11 fried chicken takeout restaurants in greater Boston. As part of a tax fraud scheme that ran for years, Khan and his co-conspirators – generally the managers of these restaurants – defrauded the government and avoided paying payroll and income taxes owed by the stores. They paid their employees in cash and provided tax preparers with false information about the restaurants’ payroll and income, thereby causing the tax preparers to file false tax returns.

    Khan repeatedly made false statements to obtain immigration benefits. Specifically, on two occasions – first in connection with obtaining legal permanent resident status and again when applying to naturalize as a U.S. citizen – Khan falsely denied that he had previously been arrested or convicted of a crime, when in fact, Khan had been previously convicted in federal court of alien smuggling.

    This is an example of how criminal law and immigration law can work hand in hand. For more information on criminal violations in immigration law and many other issues related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  4. What is Legal Workforce Act (H.R. 3711)?

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law PLLC

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Legal Workforce aCT.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	5.7 KB 
ID:	1233

    Congressman Lamar Smith (R-TX) has introduced the Legal Workforce Act (H.R. 3711), which proposes numerous changes to current law, including requiring every employer in the U.S. to use E-Verify or an electronic employment eligibility verification system.

    Here is a summary of the bill’s key provisions:

    • Mandatory employer participation in the E-Verify phased in over a two-year period based on the size of the employer;
    • Conditional job offers, based on passing E-Verify, which is contrary to current law, which prohibits use of E-Verify until a job offer is accepted;
    • Within 6 months of the bill’s enactment, these current workforce employees would have to have their employment eligibility reverified: employees who require a federal security clearance; workers assigned to a federal contract; and federal, state, and local government employee;
    • Beginning 30 days after the bill is enacted, an employer would be allowed to voluntarily use E-Verify to reverify the employment eligibility of any current employee, if the employer reverified all individuals at the same geographic location or employed within the same job category;
    • Employers would also have to use E-Verify, according to the phase-in timeline for employers based on their size, for workers with expiring work authorization;
    • Many documents, that are currently acceptable, would no longer be acceptable for proving employment eligibility;
    • Employers would be relieved of liability for any employment action taken with respect to a worker if the employer had verified the worker’s identity and employment eligibility and relied on information provided by E-Verify in good faith;
    • Would substantially increase penalties for employers who knowingly hired or employed unauthorized workers and who failed to use E-Verify or knowingly submitted false information to E-Verify, but fines for knowingly hiring or employing an unauthorized worker could be waived if the employer established that it acted in good faith;
    • Would preempt states and localities from passing employer sanctions and employment eligibility verification laws; but, it would allow states to use business licensing and similar laws to penalize employers for not using E-Verify. It would also allow a state, at its own cost, to enforce the provisions of the Legal Workforce Act if it followed the federal regulations, rules, and guidance implementing the act.


    I will keep you apprised of any actions taken toward passage of the Legal Workforce Act though it is highly unlikely that this bill will pass the U.S. Senate.
  5. DOJ Settles Immigration-Related Discrimination Claim Against Rustic Inn Crabhouse

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Rustic Crab.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	6.9 KB 
ID:	1232

    The Justice Department, through the Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER), has reached a settlement agreement with Ark Rustic Inn LLC d/b/a Rustic Inn Crabhouse (Rustic Inn), a restaurant located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The agreement resolves the IER’s investigation into whether Rustic Inn discriminated against work-authorized immigrants when verifying their employment authorization.

    The investigation revealed Rustic Inn routinely requested that work-authorized non-U.S. citizens present specific documents, such as Permanent Resident Cards or Employment Authorization Documents, to verify their citizenship status information; however, it did not subject U.S. citizens to the same verification. The anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) prohibits employers from subjecting employees to different or unnecessary documentary demands based on employees’ citizenship, immigration status or national origin.

    Under the settlement, Rustic Inn will pay a civil penalty of $4000 to the United States; review and revise any existing employment policies that relate to nondiscrimination on the basis of citizenship or immigration status and national origin so that it prohibits such discrimination in regard to the I-9 verification process; train its staff by viewing a free IER Employer/HR representative webinar; post notices informing workers about their rights under the INA’s anti-discrimination provision; shall ensure that all individuals, who are responsible for formulating and carrying out its hiring/firing, and employment eligibility verification policies, have available the most current version of the Form 1-9, USCIS Employment Eligibility Verification Handbook for Employers (M-274), and be subject to departmental monitoring for three years.

    The allegation of having different standards for U.S. citizens than non-U.S. citizens is a fairly common error by employers. However, with training by an immigration attorney, well-versed in employer compliance, these errors can easily be avoided. For more information on this issue and many others related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
Page 1 of 70 1231151 ... LastLast
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: