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I-9 E-Verify Immigration Compliance

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  1. DOJ Files Complaint Alleging Discrimination Against U.S. Citizens

    By Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

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    The Justice Department, acting through Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER), has filed a Complaint against Crop Production Services Inc. (Crop Production) of Loveland, Colorado, for allegedly discriminating against U.S. workers in violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). In announcing the Complaint, Attorney General Jeff Sessions stated, “In the spirit of President Trump’s Executive Order on Buy American and Hire American, the Department of Justice will not tolerate employers who discriminate against U.S. workers because of a desire to hire temporary foreign visa holders.”

    The Complaint, filed with Office of Chief Administration Hearing Officer (OCAHO), alleges Crop Production discriminated against at least three U.S. citizens by refusing to employ them as seasonal technicians in El Campo, Texas, because Crop Production preferred to hire temporary foreign workers under the H-2A visa program. Additionally, the Complaint alleges Crop Production imposed more burdensome requirements on U.S. citizens than it did on H-2A visa workers to discourage U.S. citizens from working at the facility. For instance, the Complaint alleged that whereas U.S. citizens had to complete a background check and a drug test before being permitted to start work, H-2A workers could begin working without completing them and, in some cases, never completed them. The Complaint also alleged Crop Production refused to consider a limited-English proficient U.S. citizen for employment but hired H-2A workers who could not speak English. Ultimately, all of Crop Production’s 15 available seasonal technician jobs in 2016 went to H-2A workers rather than U.S. workers.

    Under the INA, it is unlawful for employers to intentionally discriminate against U.S. workers because of their citizenship status or to otherwise favor the employment of temporary foreign workers over available, qualified U.S. workers. In addition, the H-2A visa program requires employers to recruit and hire available, qualified U.S. workers before hiring temporary foreign workers. The Complaint seeks back pay on behalf of the workers, civil penalties, and other remedial relief to correct and prevent discrimination.

    This Complaint and Attorney General Sessions’ statement demonstrate the ability of the Trump administration to enforce Trump’s Executive Order - Buy American and Hire American. This is the second Complaint filed in two months alleging discrimination against U.S. citizens. I discussed the first Complaint against Technical Marine Maintenance Texas LLC in a prior blog post - http://blogs.ilw.com/entry.php?10034...tus-is-Unusual.

    For the answers to many other questions related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  2. E-Verify Participation Poster Redesigned

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law
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    The USCIS has recently released a redesigned E-Verify participation poster. The new poster informs current and prospective employees of their legal rights, responsibilities, and protections in the employment eligibility verification process.

    The poster is now available in English and Spanish as one poster. Employers must replace their participation posters when updates are provided by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Thus, employers should check to see if the most current poster is available. The new posters can be downloaded when participants log into E-Verify. Employers may also display any of 16 foreign language versions of the poster.

    E-Verify employers continue to be required to display the Immigrant and Employee Rights (IER) Right to Work posters in English and Spanish.

    For the answers to many other questions related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  3. Trump’s Extreme Vetting – L-1B Site Visits

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

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    As many immigration attorneys had anticipated, L-1B site visits by the USCIS and its Fraud Detection and National Security (FDNS) officers have recently begun. This appears to be another example of the Trump administration’s extreme vetting. These site visits have occurred while companies have pending L-1B visa extensions with the USCIS.

    An L-1B visa is a transfer of an employee with specialized knowledge from a foreign office of the company or its affiliate or subsidiary to a United States facility. It is dissimilar to the H-1B visa in that it is not subject to a cap nor any salary restrictions. But, it can only be utilized by multinational corporations. It is like an H-1B visa in that it is a vehicle for a company to employ a skilled foreign worker on a non-immigrant or temporary visa. An L-1B visa holder is eligible to be employed for up to five years.

    Historically, site visits have taken place on H-1B visas, especially where the H-1B visa holder was employed off-site. As a result of Trump’s April 2017 Executive Order “Buy American and Hire American”, the administration has stated it will use a “more targeted approach” to H-1B visits – meaning more site visits where there is possible fraud or abuse in the visa application.

    Some of the pending legislation in Congress to reform or change the H-1B visa also includes changes to the L-1B visa. Senator Chuck Grassley (R – Iowa) has made the L-1B visa a target for immigration reform. Thus, this seems in keeping with the administration and their friends in Congress grouping H-1B visas with L-1B visas.

    At this point, it is difficult to determine how widespread the L-1B site visits are; however, the fact that there are L-1B site visits while a petition is pending is a change from prior administrations. I would anticipate these L-1B site visits to increase as this appears to be part of the Trump administration’s extreme vetting. I will keep you updated as more information becomes available.
    Tags: fraud, h-1b, l-1b, trump, uscis Add / Edit Tags
  4. Effects of Temination of DACA on Employers

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

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    Since President Trump’s announcement rescinding DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), media focus has been on the 800,000 DACA recipients – as it rightfully should be. However, there is going to be another entity impacted - employers of those 800,000 DACA recipients.

    Not only do employers need to be concerned about the loss of valuable employees, but employers need to be concerned with staying in compliance of immigration laws. It is fundamental immigration law that employees cannot legally work without proof of their identity and work authorization. Thus, when DACA recipients’ Employment Authorization Card (EAD) expire, employers will need to discharge DACA recipients, unless they have found another way to obtain work authorization (which is very unlikely).

    But before employers start discharging employees, one needs to be careful not to do so prematurely. During the period of DACA’s work authorization, even beyond March 5, 2018, when the USCIS will no longer approve DACA renewals, DACA employees can be authorized to legally work. It all depends on the EAD’s expiration date. Although no renewal EAD will be issued after March 5, 2018, this doesn’t mean all DACA recipients are not eligible to work after March 5, 2018.

    As an example, DACA employee Jose has an EAD which expires on March 4, 2018, so he can renew his DACA status and EAD (if the renewal is filed by October 5, 2017). Thus, he will be eligible to work until about March 2020. On the other hand, another employee, Mohammed, has an EAD pursuant to DACA, which expires on March 6, 2018. Unfortunately, March 6, 2018 is the date his employment must terminate. Thus, employers must be observant of the EAD’s expiration date.

    How does an employer even know whether the EAD is through DACA, TPS, or withholding of removal? There is a code on the front of the EAD card. For DACA, the code is C33. This code is different than codes for TPS or withholding - A10, A12 or C19.

    Some employers may ask why can’t I just discharge DACA recipients now. First, they are probably very good employees – as so many of them are proud to be legally working for the first time in their lives. Second, hopefully Congress is going to pass the DREAM Act or some other legislation that will provide for lawful employment for DACA recipients; thus, employers won’t have to face the issue. However, if an employer chose to discharge a DACA recipient based on his DACA status, it is very unlikely that the discharge would be unlawful under the anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

    Some small employers may be thinking I’m just going to look the other way and not terminate DACA recipients when their work authorization expires. Although I can understand employers not wanting to hurt their DACA employees, employers need to consider their own situation. If an employer continues to employ a worker after his work authorization expires, is not renewed, and no other work authorization is provided, they are subject to “knowingly” employing an undocumented worker. The fines for such a first offense range from $539 to over $4000, with a fine of over $3,000 being the most likely. If you have five DACA employees that you retain without work authorization, you are looking at a fine of $15,000 before Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has even looked at your Form I-9s for substantive violations. So, your heart may tell you to keep DACA recipients without work authorization; but, listen to your head, which is filled with dollar signs for fines and penalties.

    For the answers to many other questions related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, available on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  5. New I-9 Form Must Be Used as of September 18

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law PLLC

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    As I previously discussed in my July 19, 2017 blog, the USCIS released a new revised I-9 form on July 17, 2017. It becomes mandatory to use for new hires as of September 18, 2017. In the interim period, July 17 to September 17, use of the new I-9 form was optional. The newest I-9 form has a revision date of 07/17/17 N.

    There are no changes on the I-9 form or the Supplemental page. The minor changes are the addition of Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) to List C Acceptable Documents and minor wording changes in the instructions.

    USCIS has stated it will include these changes in a revised Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9 (M-274). However, to date, the USCIS has not do so. I will keep you advised.

    In order to keep you compliant and answer your questions on completing the I-9 form, using E-Verify, and state immigration laws, I have co-authored a book with Greg Siskind, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, available from Amazon at: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379
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