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  1. PEW Research Center Report: Most immigrants arrested by ICE have prior criminal convictions, a big change from 2009

    Immigrants with past criminal convictions accounted for 74% of all arrests made by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents in fiscal 2017, according to data from the agency. The remainder were classified as “non-criminal” arrestees, including 16% with pending criminal charges and 11% with no known criminal convictions or charges.

    The profile of arrestees by ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations has changed considerably in the past eight years: In fiscal 2009, the earliest yearwith comparable data, immigrants without past criminal convictionsaccounted for the majority (61%) of those arrested by the agency.

    Overall, the number of ICE arrests decreased sharply during that span, from 297,898 in 2009 (the year President Barack Obama came into office) to 143,470 in 2017 (when President Donald Trump took office). However, last year’s total represented a 30% increase from the year before, with most of the increase coming after Trump signed an executive order to step upenforcement.

    While ICE arrests overall rose from 2016 to 2017, arrests for those withoutprior convictions drove the increase. The number of arrestees without known convictions increased 146% (up more than 22,000 arrests), compared with a12% rise among those with past criminal convictions (up nearly 11,000). Still, the bulk of those arrested in 2016 and 2017 had prior convictions.

    ICE arrests can happen in a variety of ways. The agency relies on government data bases to help track fugitives, and it can detain suspects in courthouses. But in most cases, ICE takes custody of people after local or state police have arrested them.


    Posted by Nolan Rappaport

    Updated 03-06-2018 at 09:17 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs

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