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Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal

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  1. ICE Arrests Return to 2014 Obama Levels

    by , 05-19-2017 at 07:37 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Immigration and Customs Enforcement has issued statistics relating to enforcement during President Trump's first 100 days:

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – In the 100 days since President Donald J. Trump signed Executive Orders (EOs) regarding immigration enforcement priorities, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has arrested more than 41,000 individuals who are either known or suspected of being in the country illegally. This reflects an increase of 37.6 percent over the same period in 2016.

    Between Jan. 22 and April 29, 2017, ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) deportation officers administratively arrested 41,318 individuals on civil immigration charges. Between Jan. 24 and April 30, 2016, ERO arrested 30,028.


    It should be noted that the current enforcement activities are a return to the levels seen under President Obama from 2014.

    Via NPR's Latino USA:

    Although the ICE arrests listed in the latest release reflect an increase from 2016, the 41,318 individuals arrested from January 22 to April 29, 2017 are more in line with statistics from 2014 and earlier:

    Updated 05-19-2017 at 07:51 AM by MKolken

  2. Top ICE Official Moving to Largest Private Prison Company In Country

    by , 05-09-2017 at 05:18 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Via the Daily Beast:

    Daniel Ragsdale, the official in question, is second-in-command at Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the federal agency tasked with arresting, detaining, and deporting undocumented immigrants. He was temporarily the head of the agency until President Donald Trump named his replacement in January, before becoming the deputy director. Ragsdale is expected to start his new job at GEO Group, the Boca Raton-based private prison company, in a few weeks. It isn’t clear what his new title there will be.

    Click here for more of the story.

    Also see: The Democrats’ Uneasy Connection to Private Profit Deportation Jails
  3. MS 13 Gang Member with Assault Convictions Removed to El Salvador

    by , 05-08-2017 at 01:42 PM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Via Immigration and Customs Enforcement:



    WASHINGTON – A 35-year-old El Salvadoran man was removed to his home country Friday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers.

    Ingmar Guandique-Blanco, a documented MS-13 gang member, was transferred to the proper law enforcement authorities upon his arrival in El Salvador. Guandique traveled via ground transportation from Virginia to Pennsylvania where he boarded a flight to Alexandria, Louisiana. From there, ICE officers removed him from the United States onboard an ICE Air Operations flight, which departed Alexandria International Airport in Louisiana, and made its way to San Salvador International Airport in El Salvador.

    “Mr. Guandique unlawfully entered the United States, and once here, continued to violate U.S. laws by assaulting innocent victims,” said Matthew Munroe, acting ERO Washington field office director. “As a result of his actions, he has been removed to his home country of El Salvador.”

    Guandique unlawfully entered the United States at an unknown location and on an unknown date. His criminal record is lengthy, dating back to May 2001 when he was arrested on local charges by Washington, D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department. In February 2002, he was sentenced to 10 years of incarceration on each of two counts for assault with intent to commit robbery. In February 2011, he was convicted of first degree murder, but after requesting a new trial, his case was later dismissed.

    On June 30, 2016, ERO Washington officers assumed custody of Guandique from the Washington, D.C. Central Detention Facility after the murder charges against him were dismissed. He was subsequently issued a notice to appear in immigration court. On March 3, an immigration judge issued Guandique a final order of removal which enabled ICE to remove him to El Salvador.

    Prior to his removal, Guandique was detained at Farmville Detention Center in Virginia.
  4. ICE arrests 82 Individuals During 5-day Operation Focused in VA, DC

    by , 04-06-2017 at 06:13 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    WASHINGTON – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers arrested 82 individuals from 26 different countries during a five-day operation focused in Virginia and the District of Columbia that ran from March 26 to 30.

    Of the 82 individuals arrested, 68 had previous criminal convictions for crimes like armed robbery, larceny and drug distribution. Of the remaining 14, two had ties to the MS-13 street gang; two had outstanding final orders of removal; three had overstayed their visas; one was wanted by a foreign law enforcement entity; one was a verified human rights violator and two had pending local charges.

    The remainder had unlawfully entered the United States in violation of U.S. immigration laws.


    Arrests included:


    • On March 26, ERO officers arrested a 50-year-old citizen and national of Somalia in Falls Church, Virginia. He was identified as a second lieutenant in command of the Somalian National Security Service, an organization known for human rights abuses, rape, torture and extrajudicial killings. He also has a felony drug conviction.
    • On March 26, ERO officers arrested a 40-year-old citizen and national of Trinidad and Tobago in Norfolk, Virginia. He has felony drug distribution and firearm possession convictions.
    • On March 28, ERO officers arrested a 45-year-old citizen and national of the Dominican Republic in Chesterfield, Virginia. He has felony convictions for sale of a cocaine and attempted robbery.
    • On March 29, ERO officers arrested a 22-year-old citizen and national of Honduras in Fairfax, Virginia. He has felony convictions for stolen goods and grand larceny.
    • On March 29, ERO officers arrested a 34-year-old citizen and national of El Salvador in Chesterfield for being a documented MS-13 gang member who was previously removed from the United States in 2006.
    • On March 30, ERO officers arrested a 57-year-old citizen and national of Honduras in Richmond, Virginia. She has felony convictions for grand larceny and inflicting corporal injury to spouse.


    “ICE conducts targeted immigration enforcement operations focused on criminal aliens,” said ERO Washington Field Office Director Yvonne Evans. “This week’s operation successfully removed immigration violators with a variety of criminal convictions ranging from driving under the influence to grand larceny from our communities.”


    The arrestees were citizens and/or nationals of several different countries across the globe, including Algeria, Bolivia, China, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Iran, Jamaica, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Peru, Philippines, Somalia, South Korea, Sudan, Trinidad, Vietnam and Sierra Leone.


    Arrests took place across Virginia, with two taking place in the District and one in Maryland.


    Arrested individuals who have outstanding orders of deportation, or who returned to the United States illegally after being deported, are subject to immediate removal from the country. The remaining individuals are in ICE custody awaiting a hearing before an immigration judge, or pending travel arrangements for removal in the near future.
  5. A Primer on ICE Immigration Raids

    by , 02-14-2017 at 09:37 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    The good people at Syracuse University's TRAC Immigration have done it again. They just released a primer on ICE immigration raids.


    From the primer:

    According to ICE, 65,332 individuals apprehended by ICE officers were removed during FY 2016[1]. This works out to roughly 1,250 per week.

    However, only a small part of this weekly average of 1,250 apprehensions and removals last year represented ICE arrests of individuals who were picked up directly from the community in which they lived. For simplicity, we refer to this kind of arrest as "community arrests." They are arrests made through ICE raids, or when ICE agents knock on someone's door seeking to arrest the person that lives there.


    Most ICE apprehensions were not these kinds of community arrests. Instead, most of these estimated weekly 1,250 ICE apprehensions happened when ICE assumed custody of individuals held by another law enforcement agency. Many of these apprehensions occurred when ICE took individuals into custody from the prison or jail facility where they had been serving time for their criminal conviction. This was coordinated through ICE's Criminal Alien Program (CAP).


    Still others were transferred to ICE CAP custody after they were picked up and fingerprinted by local law enforcement agencies on a non-immigration matter. ICE became aware of these arrests since all fingerprints local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies submit to the FBI are now automatically passed along to ICE. ICE checks these against its records to see if the individual may be deportable.

    Click here to read the rest of the primer.

    Updated 02-14-2017 at 09:45 AM by MKolken

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