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Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal

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  1. Seven Young Undocumented Immigrants Risk Deportation Remain in Jail on Hunger Strike

    by , 12-18-2017 at 04:10 PM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Media Contact: Lucia Allain 646-488-5919, Lucyallain@gmail.com; media@fightforourdream.org

    Seven Young Undocumented Immigrants Risk Deportation, Remain in Jail on Hunger Strike Following Arrest for Peaceful Demonstration in Congressional Offices Frida

    With their lives in limbo and time running out, undocumented youth take bold action to demand that Sen. Schumer (D-NY) and Rep. Curbelo (R-FL) ensure enough votes to block any year-end spending bill that does not include a Clean Dream Act.

    Washington, DC -
    Seven DACA beneficiaries and one ally were arrested Friday calling on leaders from both parties to ensure votes to pass a Clean Dream Act by the end of the year. They are now entering day 4 of incarceration and continue to be on a hunger strike. All eight have made a decision not share personal information with police and not cooperate until Sen. Schumer and Rep. Curbelo publicly confirm that they have the votes to block any spending bill that does not include a clean Dream Act. Until then, the DACA recipients and ally are willing to stay in jail. With every day, there is an increased risk of detention by Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE).


    “We have seen this before, empty promises from both political parties. I remember being in the Senate gallery in 2010 as members of both parties voted down the DREAM Act. We had assurances from Democratic leaders that they would whip the votes. We had sympatic meetings with Republicans who said they believe we deserve an opportunity,” recalled Juan Pablo Orjuela, a DACA recipient and friend of the incarcerated. “I am now standing outside of the jail where my friends were taken, where they are exposed to the deportation machine now under control of President Trump. DACA is no longer a protection for me, it is no longer a protection for the seven who are detained. Sen. Schumer and Rep. Curbelo have the power to assure the votes needed but instead of using it, they choose to delay and make empty promises. Sen Schumer, Rep Curbelo, will you continue to stand by as my friends are at risk of deportation or will you have the courage to force your colleagues to do what you know to be right? Will you continue to delay as I count down the days until I am forced back into the shadows to live in fear of being torn from my family and community?”


    “We have been in jail for 4 days now. We haven’t eaten since Friday morning. We are tired. Our parents and communities are worried about us. But I am willing to risk deportation because I have nothing else to lose,” said one of the 7 arrested DACA beneficiaries. “We are willing to risk it all. We are asking Schumer - what are you willing to risk?”


    “Some say that we can wait to pass legislation. But every day the Dream Act does not pass, more undocumented youth are at risk of detention and deportation. There is no time to waste. We need permanent protection now.” said another one of the undocumented youth in jail.


    All eight individuals arrested were brought before a judge and charged with unlawful entry. We have reason to believe that D.C. Pre-Trial Services contacted ICE regarding one Undocumented Youth’s immigration status. There is a concern surrounding further ICE communication and engagement for the other youth as the days go by and they continue to be in police custody. One of the youth incarcerated has been reported as Erika Andiola, former press secretary for Bernie Sanders and a DACA recipient.

    Dreamers incarcerated are making a sacrifice and risking their status, deportation, and their health to protect the 800,000 Dreamers in the country. Individuals are expected be brought up before a judge Tuesday morning.

    ###


    Please contact Candice Fortin at (917) 244-7206, if you would like to interview participants involved in this action. You can view a livestream of today’s press conference
    here.

    PDF of this release.

    Fightforourdream.org

    The #OurDream campaign is a coalition effort led by undocumented youth that includes: The Seed Project, Our Revolution, Youth Caucus of America, Democracy Spring, Progressive Democrats of America, Justice Democrats, Presente.org, Good Jobs Nation, Millennials for Revolution, Undocumented, Students for Education Equity, Democratic Socialist of America (NYC), The People's Consortium for Economic and Human Rights, Inc., Working Families Party, People for Bernie, Women's March, Common Defense PAC/Vets Against Hate, Action Group Network, Million Hoodies

  2. Report Documents Concerns about ICE Detainee Treatment and Care at Detention Facilities

    by , 12-15-2017 at 08:09 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Via The Office of the Inspector General:

    In response to concerns raised by immigrant rights groups and complaints to the Office of Inspector General (OIG) Hotline about conditions for detainees held in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement(ICE) custody, we conducted unannounced inspections of five detention facilities to evaluate their compliance with ICE detention standards.

    Our inspections of five detention facilities raised concerns about the treatment and care of Ice detainees at four of the facilities visited. Overall,we identified problems that undermine the protection of detainees’ rights, their humane treatment, and the provision of a safe and healthy environment. Although the climate and detention conditions varied among the facilities and not every problem was present at all of them, our observations, interviews with detainees and staff,and our review of documents revealed several issues. Upon entering some facilities, detainees were housed incorrectly based on their criminal history. Further, in violation of standards, all detainees entering one facility were strip searched.Available language services were not always used to facilitate communication with detainees. Some facility staff reportedly deterred detainees from filing grievances and did not thoroughly document resolution of grievances. Staff did not always treat detainees respectfully and professionally, and some facilities may have misused segregation. Finally, we observed potentially unsafe and unhealthy detention conditions.

    Click here to read the report.

    Updated 12-15-2017 at 09:40 AM by MKolken

  3. ICE Arrests 101 in New Jersey Enforcement Operation

    by , 12-13-2017 at 02:01 PM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Via ICE:

    ICE arrests 101 in New Jersey operation targeting criminal aliens, illegal re-entrants and immigration violators


    NEWARK, N.J. — A Mexican national in the country illegally, who has a prior conviction for sexual assault on a minor, is among 101 foreign nationals taken into custody during a five-day operation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) last week in New Jersey, targeting at-large criminal aliens, illegal re-entrants and other immigration violators. The operation was supported by ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) New Jersey Field Office.

    Of those arrested during the operation, which was spearheaded by ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO), 88 percent were convicted criminals and 80 percent of them had prior felony convictions.


    The New Jersey enforcement effort comes days after the agency announced a 40 percent spike in administrative arrests nationwide over last year – 92 percent of which had a criminal conviction or a pending criminal charge, were an ICE fugitive, or were an illegal re-entrant.


    “The continued results of our Fugitive Operations officers and their law enforcement partners underscore ICE’s ongoing and steady commitment to public safety,” said John Tsoukaris, field office director of ERO Newark. “As part of this operation, we continue focus on the arrest of individuals who are criminal and are a threat to public safety and national security. Because of the tireless efforts of these professional officers, there are 101 fewer criminals in our communities.”

    “HSI is committed to leveraging its broad jurisdiction to further public safety in New Jersey,” said Michael McCarthy, acting special agent in charge for HSI Newark.

    “U.S. Customs and Border Protection is extremely proud to have assisted in this operation,” said Leon Hayward, acting director for the New York Field Office. “It is through collaborative efforts, such as the one leading to these arrests, that law enforcement agencies can combat illegal acts and apprehend criminals who pose a threat to the Homeland.”


    The individuals arrested throughout New Jersey were nationals of Brazil (3), Colombia (4), Congo (1), Costa Rica (3), Cuba (4), Dominican Republic (18), Ecuador (2), Egypt (2), El Salvador (7), Ethiopia (1), Georgia (1), Guatemala (6), Guyana (3), Haiti (3), Honduras (8), Jamaica (1), Korea (2), Liberia (1), Mexico (15), Nicaragua (1), Nigeria (1), Pakistan (1), Philippines (2), Peru (2), Portugal (1), Spain (2), Turkey (2), United Kingdom (1), Ukraine (1), Venezuela (1) and Vietnam (1).


    These individuals were arrested in the following counties in New Jersey: Atlantic (2), Bergen (6), Burlington (7), Camden (11), Cumberland (3), Essex (14), Hudson (15), Mercer (6), Middlesex (11), Monmouth (3), Morris (1), Passaic (9), Somerset (4), and Union (6) and the following counties in New York: Kings(1), New York (1), and Suffolk (1). They range from age 20 to 71 years old and all were previously convicted of a variety of offenses. Some of the convictions included sexual assault on a minor, child abuse, possession of narcotics, distribution of narcotics, robbery, trespassing, DUI, fraud, possession of child pornography, domestic violence, battery, receiving stolen property, theft, possession of a weapon, burglary, larceny, aggravated assault, aggravated assault on law enforcement, assault by auto, shoplifting, invasion of privacy-recording sexual act without consent, resisting arrest, endangering the welfare of a child, and illegal reentry.


    Among those arrested during this operation include:


    • A Mexican citizen convicted of sexual assault of a minor
    • A Turkish citizen convicted of possession of child pornography
    • A Peruvian citizen convicted of invasion of privacy-recording a sexual act w/o consent
    • A Colombian citizen convicted of aggravated battery and domestic violence assault
    • A Spanish citizen convicted of storing/maintaining child pornography
    • A Philippines citizen convicted of possession of methamphetamine
    • A Dominican citizen convicted of cocaine distribution and possession
    • A Guyanese citizen convicted of aggravated assault with a weapon
    • An Egyptian citizen convicted of possession of heroin
    • An El Salvadorian citizen convicted of aggravated assault with serious bodily injury
    • A Korean citizen convicted of distribution of cocaine

    ICE deportation officers conduct targeted enforcement operations every day in locations around the country as part of the agency’s ongoing efforts to protect the nation, uphold public safety and protect the integrity of our immigration laws and border controls.

    During targeted enforcement operations, ICE officers frequently encounter additional suspects who may be in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws. Those persons will be evaluated on a case by case basis and, when appropriate, arrested by ICE.


    ICE continues to focus its enforcement resources on individuals who pose a threat to national security, public safety and border security. ICE conducts targeted immigration enforcement in compliance with federal law and agency policy. However, as ICE Acting Director Thomas Homan has made clear, ICE does not exempt classes or categories of removable aliens from potential enforcement. All of those in violation of the immigration laws may be subject to immigration arrest, detention and, if found removable by final order, removal from the United States.



    Last Reviewed/Updated: 12/12/2017
  4. Muslim Immigration Has Fallen Dramatically Under Trump

    by , 12-13-2017 at 09:41 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    Via the Cato Institute:

    Muslim refugee admissions have fallen dramatically over the past year. According to figures from the State Department, Muslim refugee flows fell 94 percent from January to November 2017 (the last full month of available data). In calendar 2016, the United States admitted almost 45,000 Muslim refugees, compared to a little more than 11,000 in 2017—fully half of those entered in January and February. Of course, the administration has cut refugee flows generally, but the Muslim share of all refugees has dropped substantially too—from 50 percent in January to less than 10 percent in November.



    Immigration and travel from all countries has also declined this year, but the declines for Muslim majority countries were larger. They saw their share of all immigrant visa issuances fall 3 percent and their share of temporary visa approvals by 15 percent.



    Click here for more.
  5. Trump is Prosecuting Fewer Immigrants for Immigration Crimes

    by , 12-08-2017 at 11:48 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    No President in the history of our country prosecuted more immigrants than Obama.

    Via Syracuse University's TRAC:

    The latest available data from the U.S. Justice Department show that during FY 2017 the government reported 59,910 new immigration prosecutions. According to the case-by-case information analyzed by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) at Syracuse University, this number is down 14 percent over the past fiscal year when the number of criminal prosecutions totaled 69,636.



    Click here for the rest of the report.
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