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Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal

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  1. Foreign-Born Share Falls Among 14 Largest U.S. Hispanic Origin Groups

    by , 09-15-2015 at 10:35 AM (Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal)
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Media Contact: Molly Rohal, 202-419-4318, mrohal@pewresearch.org

    The Impact of Slowing Immigration: Foreign-Born Share Falls Among 14 Largest U.S. Hispanic Origin Groups

    As immigration from Latin America slows, the immigrant share among each of the nation’s 14 largest Hispanic origin groups is in decline, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Overall, the share of the Hispanic population that is foreign born has decreased from 40% in 2000 to 35% in 2013.

    The foreign-born share of Salvadorans fell from 76% in 2000 to 59% in 2013 – the largest percentage point decline of any of the six largest Hispanic origin groups. Dominicans, Guatemalans and Colombians all had decreases of over 13 percentage points in their foreign-born shares over the same period. Mexicans, the nation’s largest Hispanic origin group, also saw a decline, though it was only 8 percentage points since 2000.

    Despite falling immigrant shares across all Latino origin groups, fast Latino population growth has led to continued growth in the number of Latino immigrants (though growth has slowed in recent years). Among all Latinos, there were 14.1 million immigrants in 2000. By 2005, that number reached 16.8 million, and by 2013, there were 19 million Latino immigrants in the U.S. The same pattern is present among all major Latino origin groups, though for three – Ecuadorians, Mexicans and Nicaraguans – the number of immigrants has declined since 2010.

    The nation’s Latino population is its largest minority group, numbering more than 53 million, or 17.1% of the U.S. population, in 2013. It is also diverse in a number of ways. While Mexicans are by far the largest origin group at 34.6 million (making up 64.1% of all U.S. Latinos), the nation’s Latinos trace their roots to every part of Latin America. Puerto Ricans are the second-largest Latino origin group and represent about 9.5% of all U.S. Latinos. Beyond these two groups, no other makes up more than 5% of the U.S. Latino population. Cubans and Salvadorans, the two next largest groups, each make up just under 4% of the Latino population, with populations of about 2 million each.

    Even though the foreign-born share is declining among each Hispanic origin group, the share that is foreign born varies widely across them. Venezuelans had the highest foreign-born share, at 69% in 2013. They are followed by Peruvians at 65%, Guatemalans at 64% and Hondurans at 63%. Only Mexicans (33%), Spaniards (14%) and Puerto Ricans (2%) have foreign-born shares of less than half of their total population.

    Median age, educational attainment and language use vary, as well. Mexicans have the lowest median age, at 26 in 2013, while Cubans are the oldest, with a median age of 40. In terms of educational attainment, Venezuelans are the most likely to be college-educated, with half of Venezuelans ages 25 and older having completed a bachelor’s degree or more. By comparison, Salvadorans (8%), Hondurans (9%) and Guatemalans (9%) have the lowest share of adults ages 25 and older with a college degree.

    Among the five largest Hispanic origin groups, 84% of Puerto Ricans speak only English or are bilingual – a higher share than Mexicans, Dominicans, Cubans or Salvadorans. Meanwhile, just 37% of Salvadoran adults speak either English or are bilingual, among the lowest share of the five largest Hispanic origin groups.

    The report and its accompanying statistical profiles provide detailed geographic, demographic and economic characteristics for each of the nation’s 14 largest Hispanic origin groups: Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Salvadorans, Cubans, Dominicans, Guatemalans, Colombians, Spaniards, Hondurans, Ecuadorians, Peruvians, Argentineans, Nicaraguans and Venezuelans. They are for immediate release and are available at http://www.pewhispanic.org/2015/09/1...origin-groups/.

    For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact Molly Rohal at mrohal@pewresearch.org or 202-419-4318.

    Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan “fact tank” that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It does not take policy positions. The center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder.
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