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  1. Trump's DOJ Went Back to Supreme Court, But Failed, to Bar Muslim Grandparents, Bringing Back Memories of 1936 Nuremberg Laws. Roger Algase

    POLITICO reported in July that Trump's Department of Justice, in an apparent effort to make sure that not one single more Muslim immigrant is allowed to enter the US than absolutely required by the courts, appealed to the Supreme Court from a ruling by a Honolulu federal judge that Muslim grandparents should be considered "close relatives" and therefore exempt from Trump's six Muslim country ban executive order.

    Since grandparents are not in an age group generally associated with the danger of terrorist attacks, and, to the best of my knowledge, there have few if any reports of terror attacks by seniors in America, Europe, or anywhere else in the world, the "national security" pretext for barring Muslim grandparents from the US is so absurd that the whole dispute would verge on comedy - if there were not also a very dark historical precedent for obsession over grandparents in a legal enactment.

    I refer to the 1936 Nazi Nuremberg laws. These laws, which were the prelude to the ultimate goal of total exterminations of the Jewish people, had very precise definitions of who was Jewish, and therefore subject to discrimination and eventual elimination.

    http://www.britannica.com/topic/Nurnberg-Laws

    One of the best known features of that law was determining how many Jewish grandparents a person needed to have in ordered to be considered Jewish.

    This does not in any way imply that the Trump administration is anti-Semitic or supports genocide or extermination in any form. Of course it is not and does not. But using grandparents as means to advance an agenda of discrimination against any targeted minority group, whether German Jews nine decades ago or Muslim immigrants to America today, sets an unfortunate precedent and brings back memories of some of the world's darkest history.

    My respectful suggestion to the president, and to his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, who already raised eyebrows less than three years ago by praising the same Northern Europeans only 1924 immigration law in his January, 2015 immigration "Handbook" for Congressional Republicans that Adolf Hitler praised some 90 years earlier in Mein Kampf, would be to let Muslim grandparents well enough alone, and to focus on real national security issues instead.

    The world has already been there about targeting grandparents of unpopular minorities. We do not need to go there again.

    The POLITICO report is at:

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...vel-ban-240543

    Fortunately, on July 19, the Supreme Court rejected the DOJ's appeal and ruled that grandparents and other close relatives of US citizens are exempt from the Trump-Sessions Muslim entry ban.

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/19/politi...nts/index.html

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law


    Updated 08-22-2017 at 10:02 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs

  2. Congress unlikely to pay for border wall, but Trump has other options. By Nolan Rappaport



    © Getty

    President’s Trump appears willing to risk a government shutdown this fall in order to secure funds for his promised wall on the United States-Mexico border. His prospects are slim, considering Republicans lawmakers need the support of Democrats to pass a bill to fund the government.

    Trump has other options, however.

    If the president is unable to get funding for the wall, he will need another way to improve border security that Congress could agree to fund. An enforcement program to reduce the number of people making illegal crossings is a viable alternative.

    The program should include measures to prevent the removal of aliens who would benefit our national interests if they are allowed to remain. An enforcement-only approach would be counterproductive.

    Mexico certainly won’t pay for the wall. In a leaked phone conversationTrump had earlier this year with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, Nieto said, “I have recognized the right of any government to protect its borders as it deems necessary and convenient. But my position has been and will continue to be very firm saying that Mexico cannot pay for that wall.”

    And Congress may not pay for it either.

    The House recently approved a spending bill that includes $1.6 billion towards building the wall, but it has stalled in the Senate. Senate Republicans apparently want to avoid the very same spending showdown with the Democrats that Trump is willing to cause.

    Read more at
    http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blo...rump-has-other

    Published originally on The Hill.

    About the author.
    Nolan Rappaport was detailed to the House Judiciary Committee as an executive branch immigration law expert for three years; he subsequently served as an immigration counsel for the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Claims for four years. Prior to working on the Judiciary Committee, he wrote decisions for the Board of Immigration Appeals for 20 years.







  3. Congress unlikely to pay for border wall, but Trump has other options. By Nolan Rappaport



    © Getty

    President’s Trump appears willing to risk a government shutdown this fall in order to secure funds for his promised wall on the United States-Mexico border. His prospects are slim, considering Republicans lawmakers need the support of Democrats to pass a bill to fund the government.
    Trump has other options, however.

    If the president is unable to get funding for the wall, he will need another way to improve border security that Congress could agree to fund. An enforcement program to reduce the number of people making illegal crossings is a viable alternative.

    The program should include measures to prevent the removal of aliens who would benefit our national interests if they are allowed to remain. An enforcement-only approach would be counterproductive.
    Mexico certainly won’t pay for the wall. In a leaked phone conversationTrump had earlier this year with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, Nieto said, “I have recognized the right of any government to protect its borders as it deems necessary and convenient. But my position has been and will continue to be very firm saying that Mexico cannot pay for that wall.”
    And Congress may not pay for it either.
    The House recently approved a spending bill that includes $1.6 billion towards building the wall, but it has stalled in the Senate. Senate Republicans apparently want to avoid the very same spending showdown with the Democrats that Trump is willing to cause.

    Read more at
    http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blo...rump-has-other

    Published originally on The Hill.

    About the author.
    Nolan Rappaport was detailed to the House Judiciary Committee as an executive branch immigration law expert for three years; he subsequently served as an immigration counsel for the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Claims for four years. Prior to working on the Judiciary Committee, he wrote decisions for the Board of Immigration Appeals for 20 years.







  4. Letters of the Week: August 21 - August 27

  5. VISA BULLETIN: ANALYSIS FOR 2017-18

    by , 08-21-2017 at 09:05 AM (Chris Musillo on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration)
    by Chris Musillo

    The Department of State’s Visa Bulletin guru, Charlie Oppenheim, hosts monthly meetings with the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Charlie Oppenheim is the Department of State’s Chief of the Control and Reporting Division. He is the officer who is responsible for producing the Visa Bulletin each month.

    This month’s Check In With Charlie featured projections for EB-2 and EB-3, which are the most popular categories for readers of this Blog. Here are some of this month’s highlights, along with our analysis:

    EB-2 Worldwide. The Worldwide EB-2 should return to current in October and remain there for the rest of this calendar year.

    EB-2 India. This category is expected to use the full allotment of visas in September, which may result in the category becoming temporarily unavailable. Charlie hopes to advance the final action date to December 2008 in the 1Q 2018. It may advance into 2009 at some point in late FY2018.

    EB-2 and EB-3 China. In FY2018, EB-2 and EB-3 will return to the prior inverted condition where China EB-3 has a smaller retrogression than China EB-3. History tells us that this leads to China EB-3 “downgrades”.

    EB-3 Worldwide. This category will remain current or close to current for the foreseeable future.

    EB-3 India. This category will advance about one retrogress month by one real calendar month in FY 2018.

    EB-3 Philippines. It is not expected that FY2018 will be as positive as FY2017 was to this category. Charlie speculates, and Musillo Unkenholt can confirm based on our internal metrics, that progressions will slow in FY2018. We expect an average of about a 1.5-2-year retrogression in FY 2018.

    Please read the Musillo Unkenholt Healthcare and Immigration Law Blog at www.musillo.com and www.ilw.com. You can also visit us on Facebook, Twitter and LinknedIn.
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