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Blog Comments

  1. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    According to multiple news reports, "Bannon the Bigot" (my designation) has been fired from the White House by the president.

    http://thehill.com/homenews/administ...stephen-bannon

    In view of the enormous influence that, by all accounts, Bannon has had on Trump's immigration policies, could this mean that we may now have a "kinder', gentler", less racist immigration agenda in the Trump administration; or could it mean that Trump has now gone so far over in the direction of the neo-nazi white supremacists whom he so pointedly refused to single out for condemnation over Charlottesville that even Bannon is too "liberal" for the president on immigration and race relations?

    As Trump himself might say, we will have to see what happens.

    Or, could Bannon's exit, hopefully for everyone who cares about preserving America's tradition of welcoming immigrants of all ethnic backgrounds, religions and skin colors, which has been in place for the past 50 years and which Trump and Bannon have been trying to destroy, be a prelude to Trump's own resignation as president?

    http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-pol...al-writer-says

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-18-2017 at 03:41 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  2. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    David Rothkopf, a visiting professor at the Columbia University School of International Affairs writes the following in his August 16 Washington Post column in reaction to Donald Trump's appalling, unbelievably disgraceful refusal to pin the blame for the violence in Charlottesville where it belongs - on the white supremacists and neo-nazis who themselves admitted that they were inspired by Trump in organizing the rally which took three innocent lives:

    President Trump must go

    (Four words with every decent-minded American, everyone who cares about racial equality and equal justice for all, must agree with in his or her heart):

    In Rothkopf's words:

    "No one who values the best of what the United States has stood for could watch without feeling revulsion, anger or heartbreak. No one who comes from a past such as mine, which includes similar mobs rising up and ultimately collaborating in the murder of dozens of my family members in Hitler's Europe, could view Trump's performance without a degree of fear as well."

    Appalling and revolting to the conscience of every civilized person in America as Trump's despicable attempts to shield the neo-nazi instigators from blame and shift it onto a nonexistent "alt left" instead, Charlottesville, and Trump's implied support the rally of hate and violence that took place there this past Saturday, are not the main issues.

    The main issue is that America now has a president who, in so many of his speeches and actions as candidate and president, lives, breathes and exudes racist white supremacy from every pore, every fiber of his being.

    Nowhere is this clearer than in his anti-Latino, anti-Muslim, anti-Asian and anti-black immigration policies.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law


    Updated 08-16-2017 at 08:26 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  3. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    From anti-immigrant persecution and hatred of non-white minorities launched by the Trump regime, to administration-supported and encouraged neo-nazi violence at Charlottesville, to the end of freedom of speech and the onset of pure fascism in America, the line runs straight and can no longer be ignored.

    Trump's vicious, racially motivated attempts to bar Muslim immigrants from coming to the US because of their religion, his efforts to engage in mass deportation of and build a wall of hatred against Latino immigrants, and his agenda of restricting South and East Asian skilled immigrants by attacking the H-1B program, not to mention his support for the RAISE Act which seeks to close off America to most non-European immigrants in the spirit of his white supremacist Warsaw address, are all part and parcel of the white supremacist agenda which led directly to the violence at Charlottesville, which Trump now blames on the "alt-left", rather than on the neo-nazis who organized the rally as a tribute to Trump's own "leadership" and "inspiration".

    But the Trump-inspired white supremacist bigotry and hatred which was so much in evidence in the violence at Charlottesville is itself only one more step, albeit a big one, on the road that leads to overt fascism in America.

    The Guardian now reports (on August 14) that Trump's Justice Department, led by his loyal (though sometimes abused by Trump himself) henchman, Jeff Sessions, is now trying to force the owner of an anti-Trump website to turn over information about more than a million visitors to the site - in an obvious attempt to intimidate people from even looking at the site.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...rant-dreamhost

    This attempt not only to prevent people from speaking freely but even from looking to see what other people have said is not democracy - it is fascism, pure and simple.

    While it would be an exaggeration to call Charlottesville America's Kristallnacht, there is an unmistakable parallel between Trump's progression from hatred and persecution of minority immigrants, to violence against American citizens opposed to the neo-nazi movement at Charlottesville, to the fascist attempt to wipe out free speech in the DOJ's action against the Dreamhost website and anyone who viewed the site.

    This parallel is with Adolf Hitler's rise to power in the 1930's, beginning with his attacks on Jews as scapegoats, moving on to violence and repression against all perceived opponents of the regime, and finally the total extinction of freedom for all Germans.

    This is not to say that Trump has genocide or elimination of an entire race of people as his goal as Hitler did with the Jews; clearly Trump does not and has no such objective or wish.

    But the movement from singling out a vulnerable group of people for persecution, as Hitler did with the Jews and as Trump is doing with non-white immigrants, to total dictatorship cannot be ignored.

    Many people may still not believe or be willing to accept the fact that Trump has this as his ultimate goal, but many people also refused to recognize Hitler's real purpose at the beginning either.

    Anyone who wants to gain a true understanding of the real purpose and significance of Donald Trump's anti-immigrant agenda should read The Nation. February 28, 2017:

    A Warning From History: A new biography of Hitler reminds us that there is more than one way to destroy a democracy

    by Cambridge University Professor Richard J. Evans.

    (Sorry, I do not have a direct link - please go to Google; it is well worth the time and effort.)

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    algaselex@gmail.com
    Updated 08-16-2017 at 08:24 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  4. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    And where does Nolan get the evident, distorted, impression that I am the only person in America who objected to Trump's original (yes, I will call it cowardly) failure to stand up against the white supremacists and neo-nazis who caused the deadly riot in Virginia, and one of whose most prominent spokesmen claimed was inspired by the president's own views on race (including, of course, immigration)?

    Why is Nolan not paying any attention to the same Republican leaders whose immigration objectives Nolan gives so much weight to, but whom he is now ignoring when they criticize the president for many of the same reasons that I have been doing above?

    See, POLITICO, August 13,

    Republicans stand up to Trump over Charlottesville comments.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...omments-241593

    See also E.J. Dionne, writing in the Washington Post on August 13:

    After Charlottesville: End the denial about Trump

    Nolan, isn't it about time for you to end your own personal denial of the racism and bigotry toward immigrants, and black or brown people in general, that began with Trump's kickoff to his presidential campaign just over two years ago (I am not even going into his previous despicable "birther" attacks on President Obama - that is clearly going too far afield from the current topic under discussion), and have been continuing right up to the moment of the president's initial weak and equivocal response to the latest neo-nazi rally in Virginia?

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-13-2017 at 08:04 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  5. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Everything I have been saying about the president and/or his GOP supporters in response to Nolan's above article is related to issues of immigration law or policy.

    We are not talking about health care, North Korea or dozens of other issues that are not directly related to immigration and are obviously outside the scope of this discussion. Every one of my comments is in direct response to Nolan's well meant suggestion, which I have made clear that I support in principle - I am on Nolan's side here - for discussion about an immigration reform compromise.

    This is a worthy goal, Nolan. I have said so repeatedly. What is so irritating about that?

    However, having made clear that I am on Nolan's side in principle on this issue, I would also respectfully suggest that Nolan might want to accept and get used to the idea that there are some people who may, from time to time, disagree with some of his views on matters related to immigration law and policy and who may wish to express their own opinions in response to his articles.

    Isn't that what ilw.com is all about? Isn't that what free discussion, including discussion among fellow attorneys, means?

    If Nolan's various opinions are as valid as he obviously believes they are, why should he be so wary of opposing or dissenting views?

    I hope and trust that his attempts to discourage or stifle expression of views on immigration issues that are different from his own opinions are not a sign of any lack of confidence by Nolan in the validity of his own arguments.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-14-2017 at 06:59 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  6. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ImmigrationLawBlogs
    I am sure that Nolan will want to join me in congratulating and commending the president for finally showing real leadership in his, admittedly belated, clarification of his previous statement about the Charlottesville rally.

    The president has now clearly condemned the white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazis and other "extremist groups" that were responsible for this rally and the loss of three lives that resulted.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...-groups-241590

    Now, all we need is a little backtracking on Trump's unequivocal support for the RAISE Act, whose restrictions on family immigration Nolan himself has pointed out are objectionable; and then there might be a better chance of such negotiations actually producing a result, instead of merely being an empty gesture and one more excuse for Nolan to blame the Democrats for a failure whose real cause goes back to racist attitudes toward immigrants that have been of America's history from the very beginning.

    Nolan, isn't it time to admit and confront this sorry history of racism, which responsible leaders in both parties have condemned, and the effect that this history is still having on immigration policies and proposals today, rather than blaming other people for calling attention to this elephant in the presumptive immigration reform negotiating room?

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law

    Really, Roger? Don't you remember how much trouble Trump had when he used a term that identified terrorists, i.e., "Islamic Extremists." Now you are criticizing him for not being specific enough.

    But again, I wish you would make these comments in your own blogs instead of on mine. I don't care whether he is specific enough in identifying extremists or too specific. And that issue has nothing to do with my article. I made the mistake of replying anyway this time. It led nowhere. It never does.

    I wouldn't mind so much if your tangents related to immigration issues, even if they were on wildly divergent tangents. But why Trump criticisms?

    Nolan Rappaport
    Updated 08-13-2017 at 09:03 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  7. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    I am sure that Nolan will want to join me in congratulating and commending the president for finally showing real leadership in his, admittedly belated, clarification of his previous statement about the Charlottesville rally.

    The president has now clearly condemned the white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazis and other "extremist groups" that were responsible for this rally and the loss of three lives that resulted.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...-groups-241590

    Now, all we need is a little backtracking on Trump's unequivocal support for the RAISE Act, whose restrictions on family immigration Nolan himself has pointed out are objectionable; and then there might be a better chance of such negotiations actually producing a result, instead of merely being an empty gesture and one more excuse for Nolan to blame the Democrats for a failure whose real cause goes back to racist attitudes toward immigrants that have been of America's history from the very beginning.

    Nolan, isn't it time to admit and confront this sorry history of racism, which responsible leaders in both parties have condemned, and the effect that this history is still having on immigration policies and proposals today, rather than blaming other people for calling attention to this elephant in the presumptive immigration reform negotiating room?

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-13-2017 at 03:31 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  8. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ImmigrationLawBlogs
    With all due respect, Nolan is distorting my comments once again. I have made very clear above that, at least in principle, I support his suggestion of bipartisan negotiations on immigration reform, in which both the legitimate concerns of DREAMers and those of the RAISE Act proponents would be on the table for discussion.

    I am merely pointing out that both the DREAMers issue and the RAISE Act itself are inextricably tied up with the racial politics which have been part of our history, not only since the infamous Chinese exclusion laws of the late 19th century, but going back even to Benjamin Franklin's attacks against German immigrants to the British colony of Pennsylvania based on their alleged skin color before America even became independent.

    No immigration scholar of Nolan's distinguished reputation can possibly deny the existence of this history; and just in case anyone has forgotten about it, the neo-Nazis who organized the appalling August 12 violent rally of white supremacist hate which almost every Republican leader in America (except Donald Trump) has already condemned for its overt white supremacist racism have just given us a very disturbing reminder that this history is also part of America's present, not just its past.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Again, it doesn't matter whether Roger's negative opinion of the republicans is right or wrong. You have to deal with them if you want immigration reform of any kind, and saying terrible things about them is not the way to facilitate negotiations.

    Nolan Rappaport
  9. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    And just in case any readers still misunderstand my position, I am not advocating something patently absurd, such as a Democratic negotiator sitting down with Republican ones and saying: "OK, lets now talk about your racist RAISE Act"!

    What I am saying is that if we had more responsible presidential leadership, such as a little less unequivocal support for the RAISE Act, which even Nolan rightly objects to for its proposal to slash family immigration (most of which happens to be from non-white parts of the world), and a little more unequivocal condemnation of the appallingly racist and white supremacist neo-Nazis who instigated the August 12 violent hate rally in Virginia, there would be a better chance of successful bipartisan immigration reform negotiations, not ones that would be doomed to failure in advance.

    As I have pointed out in the news report links provided in my own ilw.com comment on this rally, almost every other Republican leader in America has explicitly condemned the "white nationalist" (a/k/a neo-Nazi) organizers of this rally.

    What is holding the president of the United States back from doing the same?

    As a late note to the above, the latest news reports say that the president has now clarified his remarks to condemn white supremacists, the KKK and the neo-Nazis.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...-groups-241590

    Congratulations, Mr. President! Better late than never!

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-13-2017 at 01:31 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  10. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Once again, I would respectfully encourage Nolan to confine his arguments to the legal and policy issues raised by his article's no doubt well meant proposal for immigration reform compromise and to avoid personal attacks, such as accusations of writing out of "anger" against commentators who may happen to disagree with some of his views about legal or policy matters.

    Again with all due respect, Nolan is distorting my comments once again. I have made very clear above that, at least in principle, I support his suggestion of bipartisan negotiations on immigration reform, in which both the legitimate concerns of DREAMers and those of the RAISE Act proponents would be on the table for discussion.

    I am merely pointing out that both the DREAMers issue and the RAISE Act itself are inextricably tied up with the racial politics which have been part of our history, not only since the infamous Chinese exclusion laws of the late 19th century, but going back even to Benjamin Franklin's attacks against German immigrants to the British colony of Pennsylvania based on their alleged skin color before America even became independent.

    No immigration scholar of Nolan's distinguished reputation can possibly deny the existence of this history; and just in case anyone has forgotten about it, the neo-Nazis who organized the appalling August 12 violent rally of white supremacist hate which almost every Republican leader in America (except Donald Trump) has already condemned for its overt white supremacist racism have just given us a very disturbing reminder that this history is also part of America's present, not just its past.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-14-2017 at 06:49 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  11. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ImmigrationLawBlogs
    The ancient Greeks had a word for Nolan's attempt to blame the targets of Trump's RACE Act (sorry for the entirely intentional typo) and, very possibly by implication as well, the neo-Nazi rally rally which, according to one of its own leading supporters, was inspired by Trump's promises as embodied in that bill and the rest of his immigration agenda, for the overt racism and bigotry that these Trump-supported proposals contain.

    It was known as "sophistry" in which any proposition, now matter how reasonable or true - could be turned around on its head to prove the opposite.

    At the same time, the Sophists could take any obviously false proposition and turn it around on its head to make it seem true.

    I hope I am not being unfair to the Sophists, and I apologize to them if I am.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law

    I am blaming the anger that Roger and his kindred spirits are causing with their constant, harsh criticisms and refusal to try to find a way to work with the Republicans, and with their insistence on political correctness.

    They aren't hurting the republicans; they are hurting the undocumented immigrants who are depending on the democrats to find a way to give them lawful status.

    Look through Roger's comments. Do you see anything that would facilitate compromise to reach an agreement with the republicans? Or just angry comments that shut the door to negotiations with the republicans?

    Nolan Rappaport
    Updated 08-13-2017 at 12:27 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  12. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    A respectful suggestion for Nolan to consider:

    Could we please keep this discussion on the level of legal analysis, which i have been careful to do in my above response to Nolan's article, and avoid personal attacks on the motives of commentators such as myself who may happen to disagree with Nolan's views about immigration -related laws or policy proposals?

    This discussion is about a suggestion for immigration reform legislation that Nolan makes in his article.

    It is not about Nolan's family.


    The ancient Greeks had a word for Nolan's attempt to blame the targets of Trump's RACE Act (sorry for the entirely intentional typo) and, very possibly by implication as well, the neo-Nazi rally rally which, according to one of its own leading supporters, David Duke, was inspired by Trump's promises as embodied in that bill and the rest of his immigration agenda, for the overt racism and bigotry that these Trump-supported proposals contain.

    It was known as "sophistry" in which any proposition, now matter how reasonable or true - could be turned around on its head to prove the opposite.

    At the same time, the Sophists could take any obviously false proposition and turn it around on its head to make it seem true.

    I hope I am not being unfair to the Sophists, and I apologize to them if I am.

    Nolan is not even correct when he states that I am opposed to his proposal for bipartisan negotiations on immigration reform, in which both the DREAmer's desire for more permanent legal status and the RAISE Act's proponent's wish to curtail certain types of legal immigration would be on the table.

    I have made clear that I entirely support Nolan's idea in principle and I commend him for his obviously well meant suggestion.

    I am only pointing out certain practical obstacles which would be likely to arise in the course of those negotiations - obstacles of which both the neo-Nazi hate rally in Charlottesville, and the president's pointed refusal to condemn the organizers of the rally specifically, rather than merely issuing a weak and ineffective condemnation of bigotry and racism "on many sides" - whatever that is supposed to mean - are highly disturbing symptoms of what is wrong with our society and our current administration that Nolan persists in trying or to ignore or to pretend do not exist.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-14-2017 at 06:13 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  13. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ImmigrationLawBlogs
    Nolan makes a valid point in this article, namely about cuts in family immigration quotas being unacceptable because they would hurt constituents of Senators and Representatives on both sides of the aisle.

    With regard to eliminating the diversity visa program, this might seem to make some sense on the surface, but when one looks at its history, the idea of eliminating this program has at least two strikes against it.

    Strike 1: The Democrats already tried caving and throwing this program under the bus in the last ill-fated compromise attempt at comprehensive immigration form which passed the Senate but got nowhere in the House.

    The bill which passed the Senate would have eliminated the diversity visa program entirely.

    Strike 2:
    The origin of the diversity visa program was openly racial; its predecessor, the so-called AA-1 program was clearly intended to make visas available for the white countries of Europe only (plus a couple of East Asian countries, and a handful of others around the world with significant white populations). Ultimately AA-1 morphed into the DV-1 program, which has turned out to be a big boon to non-white areas of the world, especially Sub- Saharan Africa.

    Cancelling a program that was originally devised to help white immigrants because it has since turned into one that helps mainly black and brown immigrants would be widely perceived as racially motivated legislation, and with ample justification.

    And here we come to the main flaw in Nolan's ostensibly reasonable analysis, namely that it leaves out the racial motivations that have dominated America's immigration history ever since the time of the Chinese exclusion laws, and still continue to do so.

    Just in case anyone has any doubts on that score, he or she needs only read the latest headlines about the appalling hate rally conducted on August 12 in Charlottesville, Virginia by neo-Nazi groups (now euphemistically known as "white nationalists") holding storm trooper style torches and signs saying "blood and soil" (a direct English translation of the Nazi slogan: blut und boden), in which three lives so far have been lost. See my ilw.com comment:

    http://blogs.ilw.com/entry.php?10063

    As I point out in my comment, former KKK leader David Duke had the following to say in support of that rally (whose white nationalist organizers Trump has so far refused to single out for criticism, even though most other leading Republicans in America, many of whom support Trump, have lost no time in doing so - see the sources cited in my above ilw.com comment):

    To quote David Duke:

    "This represents a turning point for the people of this country. We are determined to take our country back...We are going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump. That's what [we] believed in. That's why we voted fpr Donald Trump."

    http://www.businessinsider.com/david...e-rally-2017-8

    See also, Petuta Dvorak, writing in the Washington Post on August 13:

    Trump lit the torches of white supremacy in Charlottesville. We must extinguish them.

    (Sorry, I do not have a direct link. Please go to Google for access to this article.)

    Can there be any reasonable doubt that the RAISE Act, which is obviously intended to take America a long way backward toward the "Nordics"-only white supremacist immigration policies of the 1924 "national origins" immigration act which Adolf Hitler expressed such admiration for in Mein Kampf, is one of the "promises of Donald Trump" that David Duke was referring to in the above quote?

    At least that is one question which Democrats and other supporters of the DREAMers will no doubt be asking themselves before entering into any negotiations (as Nolan commendably recommends should take place, and clearly with the best of intentions) with supporters of the RAISE Act (which I have suggested elsewhere might more properly be called the RACE Act), and with good reason.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Roger's comments remind me of a conversation I had with my daughter when she had just turned 16 and was learning to drive. When we approached an intersection, she failed to slow down in case the car approaching it from a different direction failed to yield the right away. When I pointed this out, her response was that she had the right away.

    I told her that being right wouldn't be any comfort to her mother if the other car ran through the intersection and killed both of us.

    I am not suggesting that I think Roger is right. He isn't. He is blinded by prejudice against people who have immigration views he dislikes. My point is that it doesn't matter whether he is right or wrong. His refusal to consider immigration reform from any perspective but his own kills any chance of reaching an agreement with the republicans. Literally makes it impossible.

    Keep preaching to the choir on how awful the republicans are, bearing down especially hard on Trump (the reincarnation of Hitler...or is it Satan?). It won't hurt you. It will just hurt the DREAMers and other undocumented aliens who might benefit from working with the republicans.

    Nolan Rappaport
  14. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Update, August 17, 8:11 am:

    Nolan, out of respect for the death of the brave young woman who gave her life in opposing the white supremacist neo-nazi bigots at the August 12 Charlottesvile rally, don't you think that the Republicans should withdraw the RAISE Act, which the neo-nazi leader, Richard Spencer, has called "awesome" according to the Huffington Post, from consideration and make sure that it never sees the light of day again?

    Shouldn't you also consider withdrawing your own article above, which seems to give some legitimacy to this racially motivated bill as a "basis for negotiation"?

    How can anyone one negotiate with white supremacist hate, as Spencer correctly sees embodied in this bill?

    Just a helpful suggestion.


    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law

    My earlier comments to Nolan's article follow below:

    This is an update as of 2:25 pm on August 13 to my original comments below to note that the White House has now updated its original comment on the Charlottesville rally to condemn all "extremist groups", including white supremacists, the KKK and neo-Nazis.

    This clarification by the president is as welcome as it is overdue.

    Better late than never, Mr. President!

    My original responses to Nolan's above article appear below:

    Nolan makes a valid point in this article, namely about cuts in family immigration quotas being unacceptable because they would hurt constituents of Senators and Representatives on both sides of the aisle.

    With regard to eliminating the diversity visa program, this might seem to make some sense on the surface, but when one looks at its history, the idea of eliminating this program has at least two strikes against it.

    Strike 1: The Democrats already tried caving and throwing this program under the bus in the last ill-fated compromise attempt at comprehensive immigration form which passed the Senate but got nowhere in the House.

    The bill which passed the Senate would have eliminated the diversity visa program entirely.

    Strike 2:
    The origin of the diversity visa program was openly racial; its predecessor, the so-called AA-1 program was clearly intended to make visas available for the white countries of Europe only (plus a couple of East Asian countries, and a handful of others around the world with significant white populations). Ultimately AA-1 morphed into the DV-1 program, which has turned out to be a big boon to non-white areas of the world, especially Sub- Saharan Africa.

    Cancelling a program that was originally devised to help white immigrants because it has since turned into one that helps mainly black and brown immigrants would be widely perceived as racially motivated legislation, and with ample justification.

    And here we come to the main flaw in Nolan's ostensibly reasonable analysis, namely that it leaves out the racial motivations that have dominated America's immigration history ever since the time of the Chinese exclusion laws, and still continue to do so.

    Just in case anyone has any doubts on that score, he or she needs only read the latest headlines about the appalling hate rally conducted on August 12 in Charlottesville, Virginia by neo-Nazi groups (now euphemistically known as "white nationalists") holding storm trooper style torches and signs saying "blood and soil" (a direct English translation of the Nazi slogan: blut und boden), in which three lives so far have been lost. See my ilw.com comment:

    http://blogs.ilw.com/entry.php?10063

    As I point out in my comment, former KKK leader David Duke had the following to say in support of that rally (whose white nationalist organizers Trump has so far refused to single out for criticism, even though most other leading Republicans in America, many of whom support Trump, have lost no time in doing so - see the sources cited in my above ilw.com comment):

    To quote David Duke:

    "This represents a turning point for the people of this country. We are determined to take our country back...We are going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump. That's what [we] believed in. That's why we voted fpr Donald Trump."

    http://www.businessinsider.com/david...e-rally-2017-8

    See also, Petuta Dvorak, writing in the Washington Post on August 13:

    Trump lit the torches of white supremacy in Charlottesville. We must extinguish them.

    (Sorry, I do not have a direct link. Please go to Google for access to this article.)

    Can there be any reasonable doubt that the RAISE Act, which is obviously intended to take America a long way backward toward the "Nordics"-only white supremacist immigration policies of the 1924 "national origins" immigration act which Adolf Hitler expressed such admiration for in Mein Kampf, is one of the "promises of Donald Trump" that David Duke was referring to in the above quote?

    At least that is one question which Democrats and other supporters of the DREAMers will no doubt be asking themselves before entering into any negotiations (as Nolan commendably recommends should take place, and clearly with the best of intentions) with supporters of the RAISE Act (which I have suggested elsewhere might more properly be called the RACE Act), and with good reason.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-18-2017 at 10:45 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  15. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    The removal figures are misleading. Obama padded the figures by counting aliens caught at the border after making an entry without inspection. Removal of aliens from the interior went down during his administration.

    I am not suggesting that your comments are misleading, Matthew. They aren't. We are being mislead by the way the Obama administration collected and reported enforcement statistics.

    For more details go to this link.


    Nolan Rappaport
  16. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Posted by mistake. I hit the post key twice accidentally.
  17. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    I'm not sure I understand. What exactly has changed? Is the only change that Trump isn't pulling people out of the backlog for removal proceedings and sending them home as a matter of prosecutorial discretion?

    Nolan Rappaport
  18. IDBlog's Avatar
    This is how diplomats treat Senior American citizens in Argentina and also to wives applying for a visa. No comments needed, just -please- see this:


    Please join us to welcome vice-president Pence to Argentina at the embassy with this video and flyers!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?<wbr>v=k8t3H4nrtnc&feature=youtu.be


    Thank you,


    Julian Ortuondo
  19. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    The following comment is not directly concerned with immigration policy, but it does involve the larger question of how long Donald Trump, arguably the most anti-immigrant president America has had in almost almost a century, since the time of Calvin Coolidge and the notorious 1924 "Nordics" only immigration act which he signed, can expect to remain in office as president.

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation is closing in on Trump, perhaps slowly, but surely as The Guardian reports on August 5:

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...d-trump-russia

    As the Handwriting on the Wall in the Mueller investigations starts to look more and more like the Biblical words: Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin in the Book of Daniel for Donald Trump, his temptation to engage in even wilder and more dangerous saber-rattling with the paranoid North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un,

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...iplomacy-talks

    in order to turn attention away from the Mueller investigations becomes understandably greater.

    The question is whether Trump's understandable wish to do anything possible to turn attention away from Robert Mueller could lead to a confrontation with North Korea that could turn this planet into a nuclear wasteland where no place that anyone would want to immigrate to would any longer exist, and there would be no people left to become immigrants anywhere on earth.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 08-08-2017 at 09:39 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  20. JDzubow's Avatar
    I am not as pessimistic as Nolan about this - I do not think Trump will be able to push millions of cases into expedited removal. I do think many aliens will be able to show that they have been in the US more than 90 days, and so I doubt expedited removal will make a big dent in the undocumented population. Take care, Jason
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