ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
© 1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

All Blog Entries

  1. Compete America Letter

    The CTIHS -- which formally has combined its effort with the AAIHR -- was asked to become a signatory to Compete America's sign-on letter. The July 17 letter asks Congress to enact three pieces of legislation: H.R. 6039, H.R. 5921 and H.R. 5882.

    As explained in the letter, the three bills will address many shortcomings in the EB green card system. For example:

    - H.R. 6039, by exempting highly educated, foreign-born students earning an advanced degree in science, technology, engineering or mathematics from a U.S. university from the annual EB green card limit, would help U.S. employers retain these talented individuals in the U.S. workforce. For example, foreign nationals comprise half of the master's and 70 percent of the Ph.D.s in electrical engineering from U.S. universities.

    - H.R. 5921 will help put an end to multi-year wait times by eliminating unduly restrictive per country limits on EB green cards.

    - H.R. 5882 will help to reduce visa backlogs by "recapturing" EB green cards from prior years that went unused due to government processing delays and making them available immediately to those who meet the requirements.

    These three bills, along with H.R. 5924, are all viable candidates for enactment this summer/fall. By partnering with Compete America, the CTIHS/AAIHR raises its profile. Members of Compete America include some of America's largest and most prestigious companies and organizations.
  2. IMMIGRANT OF THE DAY: KHATUNA LORIG - OLYMPIC ARCHER

    by , 07-20-2008 at 07:45 PM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)

    Khatuna Lorig will represent the US in Women's Archery at the Beijing Olympics. She previously competed for the Former Soviet Union at the 1992 Games (where she earned a bronze medal) and then the Republic of Georgia in 1996 and 2000. She just missed qualifying in 2004. Now she'll compete in her fourth Olympics for her new country.

    Good luck Khatuna!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	khatuna_lorig_headshot_archery.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	9.2 KB 
ID:	408  
  3. 33 NATURALIZED US CITIZENS TO COMPETE FOR THEIR COUNTRY IN BEIJING

    by , 07-20-2008 at 07:23 PM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    According to the Associated Press, this is more than a 20% increase since the 2004 Olympics. The AP article also has some humorous quotes from the antis basically saying that we should only be allowing in Olympic athletes and Nobel Prize winners. What these less than Nobel-level thinkers don't get is that the immigrant society that is the United States is one of the key reasons these 33 athletic superstars chose the US. Some of the athletes came as refugees and at least one was an illegal alien when he entered the country. So I presume the antis should have put an asterisk after their remarks.

    By the way, I'll be featuring many of these athletes over the next month in my Immigrants of the Day posts.
  4. NATURALIZATION CASES - HOW LONG IS TOO LONG?

    by , 07-20-2008 at 04:02 PM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    Dan Kowalski at Bender's Immigration Bulletin has posted an interesting case from the District Court in the Northern District of California. The court in the case of Reddy v. Mueller found that a two year wait in a naturalization case is presumed to be too long and the judge ordered the immigration service to adjudicate the case within 90 days whether the security clearance is finished or not. USCIS argued that it is overworked and simply can't turn cases around faster. The judge was polite, but dismissive:Yet, although this court appreciates the administrative burden faced by defendants, it does not find that assertions of overwork alone are sufficient to justify substantial delays.See Yu v. Brown, 36 F. Supp.2d 922, 934 (D.N.M. 1999) ("[D]elays of [a significant] magnitude, particularly when they occur over uncomplicated matters of great importance to the individuals involved, may not be justified merely by assertions of overwork.") (citations omitted). There has been no particularized showing that Reddy's application is especially [*5] complex or presents any national security concerns.Here's the document and you can also download it directly at Bender's.


    Reddy v. Mueller - N.D. California (from Bender's Immigration Bulletin) - Get more Legal Forms
  5. IS THIS AMERICA'S FRIENDLIEST CITY?

    by , 07-20-2008 at 05:48 AM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    I have always loved Nashville from my college days and the eight years I lived in the city after law school. I still make it up every month or so to visit clients. The city is beautiful, has wonderful people, great restaurants and culture and well deserves its ranking as one of America's friendliest cities.

    So it really breaks my heart to see anti-immigrant forces in the city working to destroy this atmosphere. Nashville pioneered the 287(g) movement where the city's police force has become an immigration enforcement agency to itself.

    What happens when your community has a 287(g) agreement? Read this article in today's New York Times about the latest in a string of cases in Nashville that is, quite simply, abhorrent.
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: