ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
© 1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

All Blog Entries

  1. STEM PROFESSIONS

    by , 04-04-2008 at 05:19 PM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    I'm still working on the FAQ, but here's a question and document you may find helpful given some of the questions you're posting. The CIP is hundreds of pages long, but I've extracted the relevant pages and redacted out professions not qualifying. So every occupation on the attached lists will qualify as a STEM profession.




    What are STEM professions?

    STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and math. USCIS will refer to a "STEM Designated Degree Program List" that is based on the US Department of Education's "Classification of Instructional Programs" (CIP) 2000 report which can be found online at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2002165 .

    According to USCIS, the list of degrees includes those degrees in the following fields:

    Actuarial Science. NCES CIP Code 52.1304

    Computer Science: NCES CIP Codes 11 .xxxx (except Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, NCES CIP Codes 11.06xx)

    Engineering: NCES CIP Codes 14.xxxx

    Engineering Technologies: NCES CIP Codes 15.xxxx

    Biological and Biomedical Sciences: NCES CIP Codes 26.xxxx

    Mathematics and Statistics: NCES CIP Codes 27.xxxx

    Military Technologies: NCES CIP Codes 29.xxxx

    Physical Sciences: NCES CIP Codes 40.xxxx

    Science Technologies: NCES CIP Codes 41.xxxx

    Medical Scientist (MS, PhD): NCES CIP Code 51.1401

    Download combined_stem_list.pdf




  2. MY SUMMARY OF THE OPT RULE

    by , 04-04-2008 at 12:47 PM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    Folks - Given the extremely important news from today on OPT extensions, I'm rushing to put together a detailed FAQ which I will try and upload this evening. So stay tuned. On the E-Verify questions, I've already put together what I think is one of the most complete articles on the subject and have updated it a few posts ago. Note the rule is nearly 50 pages so this is why I can't get this up faster.
  3. THE ABCS OF E-VERIFY

    by , 04-04-2008 at 12:34 PM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    Suddenly employers have a powerful new incentive to use E-Verify given the shortage of H-1B visas that force many F-1 students to leave the country upon conclusion of their training programs. F-1 students who work for employers using E-Verify will get 29 months of training instead of just 12. This means two extra chances at the H-1B lottery and more time to get green card applications processed as a method of potentially bypassing the H-1B process all together or at least minimizing the gap in time someone may need to spend abroad.

    I've just finished the manuscript for a book I've written on employer compliance and have included a chapter on E-Verify. Because the interest in E-Verify will likely spike as a result of this rule, I've decided to publish the E-Verify chapter online now rather than wait. So here goes. Also, some of you may not know that I blog on employer compliance (including the E-Verify subject) at http://immcomp.blogspot.com.

    Download everify_q_a.pdf

  4. USCIS RELEASES RULE EXTENDING F-1 PRACTICAL TRAINING TO 29 MONTHS

    by , 04-04-2008 at 10:39 AM (Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy)
    But before you jump for joy, this only applies if you have an employer using E-Verify and you must be in a profession in the sciences, technology, engineering or math. This will potentially give a big boost to the electronic verification system and I'll have much more to present on E-Verify soon.

    The other major news from the rule is a new cap gap provision that grants an automatic two month work and travel extension for those in F-1 status who are waiting on an H-1B October 1st start date.

    I'll be covering this important news in greater depth over the weekend so check back. In the mean time, here's the USCIS press release.

    Download ead_rule.pdf

  5. The New Form 9089

    by , 04-04-2008 at 09:21 AM (Joel Stewart on PERM Labor Certification)
    DOL has published the New Form 9089 in the Federal Register. I decided to take a look and see what's new, what's changed, what's better, and what, if anything, is worse.

    However, in this Blog entry, I would like to explain that by chance last week's Blog was written just as the new Form 9089 was being released by DOL. Specifically, last week I was writing about the OMB Processing Time Statement, which says on the old form that it takes 1 1/4 hours to prepare and file a Form 9089. I suggested that this figure was very unrealistic, but, naturally, when I saw the new Form 9089, the first thing I did was go to the end of the Form to check the new OMB data. The OMB response time for the new Form 9089 has been changed from 1 1/4 hours to 2 hours per response.

    The form is now 17 pages, and the instructions are 23 pages. That's a total of 40 pages. Is two hours sufficient time? Senator Obama has stated that right now one out of every five adults in the United States can not read a simple story to their child, and that during the last twenty years or so, over ten million Americans reached the 12th grade without having learned to read at a basic level, and 34% of Americans have not reached a 4th Grade Reading Level.

    It seems to me that if the OMB figures represent average American skills, and not the high or low end, it would take well over the two hour OMB figure for an average American just to read the 40 page form and instructions, not to mention the task of gathering information, preparing and filing the form itself.

    Do you feel otherwise? If so, please send your opinion to this Blog.

    My next entry, which I promise to complete this weekend, will cover the changes on the new 9089 Form.





Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: