ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
© 1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

Recent Blogs Posts

  1. Letters of the Week: November 6 - November 12

    Please email your letters to editor@ilw.com

    Updated 11-06-2017 at 04:59 PM by IDBlog

  2. Massachusetts restaurateur sentenced for multiple fraud schemes

    By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law PLLC


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	handcuffs (37).jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	14.7 KB 
ID:	1234

    A restaurant owner, Hazrat Khalid Khan, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and one year of supervised release in federal court in Boston for committing tax and insurance fraud involving 11 Boston-area restaurants, and for committing visa and immigration fraud. Also, he will be subject to deportation proceedings upon completion of his sentence. Khan was ordered to pay restitution of $2,343,155 to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and $27,863 to two insurance companies he defrauded. The sentencing follows a multiagency investigation, which included Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

    In April 2017, Khan pleaded guilty to conspiring to defraud the IRS, failing to collect and pay over taxes, committing mail fraud, making false statements on a naturalization application, and committing visa fraud.

    Khan was the partial owner of 11 fried chicken takeout restaurants in greater Boston. As part of a tax fraud scheme that ran for years, Khan and his co-conspirators – generally the managers of these restaurants – defrauded the government and avoided paying payroll and income taxes owed by the stores. They paid their employees in cash and provided tax preparers with false information about the restaurants’ payroll and income, thereby causing the tax preparers to file false tax returns.

    Khan repeatedly made false statements to obtain immigration benefits. Specifically, on two occasions – first in connection with obtaining legal permanent resident status and again when applying to naturalize as a U.S. citizen – Khan falsely denied that he had previously been arrested or convicted of a crime, when in fact, Khan had been previously convicted in federal court of alien smuggling.

    This is an example of how criminal law and immigration law can work hand in hand. For more information on criminal violations in immigration law and many other issues related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.
  3. To tackle illegal immigration, go after the employers. By Nolan Rappaport


    © Getty

    The job magnet is making it impossible to secure the Southwest border. The availability of jobs in the United States attracts immigrants who need work and are willing to do whatever they have to do to cross the border.

    Congress tried to eliminate the job magnet by establishing employer sanctions with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA). The theory was that if employers were sanctioned for hiring aliens who do not have work authorization, they would stop hiring them.

    This was expected to prevent a new group of undocumented aliens from taking the place of the ones IRCA was going to legalize.

    It didn’t work. Approximately 2.7 million undocumented aliens were legalized, but by the beginning of 1997, they had been replaced entirely by a new group of undocumented aliens.

    It failed because the sanctions were not applied on a large-scale, nationwide basis. This is necessary to make employers throughout the United States afraid that they will be sanctioned if they hire undocumented workers. And it has continued to fail for the same reason. According to the Pew Research Center, there were 8 million unauthorized immigrants working or looking for work in the United States in FY2014.

    The government has had more than 30 years to make the sanctions work, and it hasn’t happened. It is unrealistic at this point to expect it ever to happen. A new approach should be considered. But first, let’s look at what employer sanctions do.

    Read more at

    http://thehill.com/opinion/immigrati...-the-employers

    Published originally in The Hill.

    About the author. Nolan Rappaport was detailed to the House Judiciary Committee as an executive branch immigration law expert for three years; he subsequently served as an immigration counsel for the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Claims for four years. Prior to working on the Judiciary Committee, he wrote decisions for the Board of Immigration Appeals for 20 years.








    Updated 11-06-2017 at 09:24 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs

Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: