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The migrant crisis is still a growing burden for Europe. By Nolan Rappaport

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French President Emmanuel Macron's government introduced a bill last week that would accelerate the expulsion of migrants who do not qualify for asylum and make illegal border crossings a criminal offense punishable by one year in jail and a fine.

And Hungary is considering a bill that would include entry bans on foreigners and restraining orders to stop Hungarians from going to border areas if they are deemed to be “supporting” or “organizing” illegal immigration.

It isn’t surprising that European countries are adopting harsh measures to deal with the wave of asylum-seeking migrants that began in 2015. They cannot secure their borders effectively.

The European Union (EU) established the Schengen Agreement in 1985, which abolished the internal border checks of signatory countries. This provides free and unrestricted movement between countries in the Schengen Area for the more than 400 million nationals of the 26 signatory countries, and of goods, services, and capital, in harmony with common rules for controlling external borders.

It isn’t surprising that European countries are adopting harsh measures to deal with the wave of asylum-seeking migrants that began in 2015. They cannot secure their borders effectively.The European Union (EU) established the Schengen Agreement in 1985, which abolished the internal border checks of signatory countries. This provides free and unrestricted movement between countries in the Schengen Area for the more than 400 million nationals of the 26 signatory countries, and of goods, services, and capital, in harmony with common rules for controlling external borders
.



However, there is a mandatory visa requirement to enter the Schengen Zone for some non-member countries.

Under schengen rules, signatories may reinstate internal border controls for 10 days when this has to be done immediately for "public policy or national security" reasons. If the need continues, the controls can be maintained for "renewable periods" of up to 20 days and for a maximum of two months.

The EU’s “open borders” policy permits European states to shunt migrants from one country to the next instead of having to deal with a mass influx into its own territory.

Read more at http://thehill.com/opinion/immigrati...den-for-europe

Published originally on The Hill.

About the author. Nolan Rappaport was detailed to the House Judiciary Committee as an executive branch immigration law expert for three years; he subsequently served as an immigration counsel for the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Claims for four years. Prior to working on the Judiciary Committee, he wrote decisions for the Board of Immigration Appeals for 20 years.




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  1. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    No one will deny that there are contentious issues relating to refugees and other non-white immigrants in Europe - not only Hungary, where a leading anti-immigrant politician has also called for the registration of all Jews, a throwback to the Nazi extermination of almost the entire Jewish population of that country in WW2. This same antisemitic politician was also, if memory serves me correctly, the first in his country to advocate building a Wall against Middle Eastern and African refugees, similar to the one that Trump wants to build against Mexican, Latino and other non-white immigrants.

    No one should think for a moment that darker skinned Muslim and African immigrants are the only objects of hatred among Europe's right wing politicians.

    We should not forget what an American commentator, Harry Golden, a number of years ago, called the "all time favorite" when it comes to persecuted minorities.

    But, to the best of my knowledge, no politician in Europe has referred to refugees

    as "Snakes".

    That particular "achievement" in the demonization and dehumanization of immigrants who happen to be of a different color or religion from the white majority belongs to Donald Trump, president of the United States, as discussed in my February 26 ilw.com post dealing with his recent CPAC speech.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law

    Updated 02-26-2018 at 02:07 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  2. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Nor is Europe the only place outside the US where the skin color of desperate and vulnerable refugees has become a big issue. Israel is now starting to deport thousands of well assimilated, Hebrew-speaking African refugees, who had entered that country to escape imprisonment, torture and war in countries such as Eritrea and Somalia, and who can justly claim to be Israel's "Dreamers", according to a March 5 Washington Post story called The Future of Israel's 'Dreamers' (which I will discuss further in my own upcoming blog comment on this issue).

    How sad that a country that was founded as a refuge for people who know better than any other what it means when the nations of the world close their gates to refugees; and which was established on one of the most basic principles in all of Judaism, namely that "We were once strangers in the land of Egypt", should be expelling people because of the color of their skin.

    For more on the heartbreaking stories of the black people whom Israel is now deporting, and an article on a protest against this by 45 (so far) American rabbis, cantors and rabbinical students, see:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...israel/551747/

    and

    http://action.nif.org/p/dia/action4/...tion_KEY=10640

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 03-06-2018 at 09:04 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
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