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Attorney General Jeff Sessions On Children Separated From Parents At Border, F-1 Visas For PRC Students, And Masterpiece Cakeshop Decision

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Transcript:


HH: I’m so pleased to welcome back to the Hugh Hewitt Show the Attorney General of the United States, Jeff Sessions. General Sessions, welcome back.


JS: Good morning, Hugh.

HH: Let me begin. Is it absolutely necessary, General, to separate parents from children when they are detained or apprehended at the border?


JS: Yes. What’s happening is we are having more people coming bringing children with them entering between the ports of entry, between the ports of entry illegally, and they’re not, you cannot give them immunity. That’s an offense. We believe every person that enters the country illegally like that should be prosecuted. And you can’t be giving immunity to people who bring children with them recklessly and improperly and illegally. They should never do that. And so those children are being well taken care of. Within 72 hours, they’re taken to the Health and Human Services to be sure they’re properly cared for. And those persons will have, the adults will be prosecuted like the law requires.

HH: I understand the prosecution part. But is it necessary to separate the children? Could they not be detained in facilities where at least mothers and infants could remain together?


JS: Well, most are not infants. Most are teenagers, although we do have a number of younger ones now, more than we’ve seen recently. And they are maintained in a very safe environment not by the law enforcement team at Homeland Security, but put with Health and Human Services. And they are kept close by, and if the person pleads guilty, they would be deported promptly, and they can take their children with them. And, but we do, the Homeland Security can only keep these children for 72 hours before they go to Health and Human Services.


Read more at:

http://www.hughhewitt.com/attorney-g...and-f-1-visas/

Posted by Nolan Rappaport

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Comments

  1. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    The following is a quote from the above interview transcript:

    Hewitt:

    "Mr. Attorney General, surely you'll agree that [separation from the parent] is a terrible thing for the child, isn't it?"

    Sessions:

    "Yes it is..."

    No further comment is necessary.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Updated 06-07-2018 at 08:59 PM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
  2. ImmigrationLawBlogs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ImmigrationLawBlogs
    The following is a quote from the above interview transcript:

    Hewitt:

    "Mr. Attorney General, surely you'll agree that [separation from the parent] is a terrible thing for the child, isn't it?"

    Sessions:

    "Yes it is..."

    No further comment is necessary.

    Roger Algase
    Attorney at Law
    Roger took the question about the kids out of context and misquoted Sessions' answer. I will paste the pertinent paragraphs here to make it easier for him to find them:

    HH: Let me begin. Is it absolutely necessary, General, to separate parents from children when they are detained or apprehended at the border?

    JS: Yes. What’s happening is we are having more people coming bringing children with them entering between the ports of entry, between the ports of entry illegally, and they’re not, you cannot give them immunity. That’s an offense. We believe every person that enters the country illegally like that should be prosecuted. And you can’t be giving immunity to people who bring children with them recklessly and improperly and illegally. They should never do that. And so those children are being well taken care of. Within 72 hours, they’re taken to the Health and Human Services to be sure they’re properly cared for. And those persons will have, the adults will be prosecuted like the law requires.

    HH: I understand the prosecution part. But is it necessary to separate the children? Could they not be detained in facilities where at least mothers and infants could remain together?

    JS: Well, most are not infants. Most are teenagers, although we do have a number of younger ones now, more than we’ve seen recently. And they are maintained in a very safe environment not by the law enforcement team at Homeland Security, but put with Health and Human Services. And they are kept close by, and if the person pleads guilty, they would be deported promptly, and they can take their children with them. And, but we do, the Homeland Security can only keep these children for 72 hours before they go to Health and Human Services.

    HH: But General, what I’m pressing on, because I’m disturbed by this. I don’t think children should be separated from biological parents at any age, but especially if they’re infants and toddlers. I think it’s traumatic and terribly difficult on the child. Is it absolutely necessary to do so? Can’t we have facilities where parents remain united with kids?

    JS: Well, we can, we’d be glad to work at that, and actually, to keep them as close as possible, and then they’re deported. But the law requires us to keep children in a different facility than we do for adults. And every time somebody, Hugh, gets prosecuted in America for a crime, American citizens, and they go to jail, they’re separated from their children. We don’t want to do this at all. If people don’t want to be separated from their children, they should not bring them with them. We’ve got to get this message out. You’re not given immunity. You have to, you will be prosecuted if you bring, if you come illegally. And if you bring children, you’ll still be prosecuted.

    HH: I understand the message.

    JS: I’m saying the only thing we can do about this, and certainly, we prefer to keep the children close by. And if we have a prompt hearing, as we do in many cases, they go back home with their children.

    HH: You know, I understand the deterrent, and I understand there are 2.7 million children in America with a parent who’s incarcerated and are separated. But if it’s possible to build detention facilities, because these people have not been adjudicated guilty, they’re under suspicion, could we not provide...I spent 17 years in Orange County working on children and families issues trying to keep people who fell into homelessness together with their children because of the impact on children, Mr. Attorney General. Surely, you’ll agree that’s a terrible thing for a child, isn’t it?

    JS: Well, it is, but this is not like somebody getting ten years in jail. I mean, these are often within days. Now if they get into a prolonged asylum process, the children are then turned over to some sort of family that is to take care of them while the adult may be in trial. But basically, the adults are frequently getting bail, too, and be able to be with their children. So it’s not, it’s certainly not our goal to separate children, but I do think it’s clear, it’s legitimate to warn people who come to the country unlawfully bringing children with them that they can’t expect that they’ll always be kept together.

    Nolan Rappaport
    Updated 06-11-2018 at 10:56 AM by ImmigrationLawBlogs
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