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Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy

SUE 'EM

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One would think that a $675 filing fee would be enough to ensure prompt service on a naturalization case. If you're one of the many people whose cases have been dragging out for years, you know better. The Washington Post is reporting that many applicants are turning to the courts to force USCIS to pay attention to their cases.

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  1. hmm's Avatar
    The Washington Post article is misleading. Well, maybe it is accurate for Alexandria VA, but surely in other parts of the country things are not as rosy, so before trying to "sue'em" it pays to find out the rate of success in your area. It varies dramatically from state to state. Most recent wins I have seen involve >3 year wait. I did see some lost cases with wait over 2 years, and e.g. in my area most people drop their litigation after getting Motion to Dismiss which comes to everybody these days.


  2. 's Avatar
    Man these guys have it easy. Only 10 years to citizenship!!
  3. hmm's Avatar
    not sure where you start counting, but those who applied for citizenship 3 years ago likely went through 5 year labor certification, so this is 15, not 10.
  4. Greg Siskind's Avatar
    Actually, probably even more. Assume that it took five years to get a green card. Then one must be a permanent resident for five years before being permitted to apply for citizenship. So it is possible this person has been working toward citizenship for 20 years.
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