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Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy

US SOLDIER IN AFGHANISTAN FACES DEPORTATION UPON RETURN HOME

Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.

Thanks from a grateful nation...



Appreciate your alerting us to this, USC.

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Comments

  1. JoeF's Avatar
    I am speechless.
  2. R. Lawson's Avatar
    These are the people we should be bending over backwards to keep in this country. Simply shameful. A GC should instantly be granted to anyone completing bootcamp and reporting to their initial schools. Citizenship should be granted automatically after a short period (a year?) of honorable service.

    I'm the guy some of you have refered to as "anti". So if I am saying this, it's a no-brainer.

    The best thing about this situation is that I suspect legislation will be passed because of it. We'll see if Congress is asleep on the job or not. I think everyone can agree that immigrants serving in the military (especially the ones in war zones) deserve to be citizens.
  3. I's Avatar
    Come on....it is perfectly acceptable to abuse any Moozlem or Ayrab in the name of war on terrah.....do not believe it, check this story... http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2002144988_yeeintroduction.html

  4. Another Voice's Avatar
    I am sure this story will get immigrants to want to serve in the military. What is the message here go die for this country and if you survive we will reward you with a plane ticket back home thanks for your sacrifice.
  5. 's Avatar
    "I think everyone can agree that immigrants serving in the military (especially the ones in war zones) deserve to be citizens."

    Not really. If you read the article the guy is suspected of immigration fraud. So yes, he will doubtless get a fair hearing but he may just be collateral damage in the broader effort to enforce immigration laws.

  6. USC's Avatar
    "Not really. If you read the article the guy is suspected of immigration fraud."

    As I do not respond to no name posters, I am unable to counter your statement. However, you might want to re-read the article.
  7. 's Avatar
    I guess you should read it closer. Here's the relevant portion where we discover the marriage was annuled.

    "immigration officials discovered that he had failed to register his first marriage and alleged that the ceremony had been arranged fraudulently to get him into the country.

    Benkabbou says that the marriage was annulled and argues it is therefore irrelevant to his immigration status."

    And here's the definition of annulment. Note that it is retroactive : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annulment

    If the marriage was never supposed to have existed, then the basis for granting the green card also never existed. Therefore the implication of fraud.
  8. USC's Avatar
    "I guess you should read it closer. Here's the relevant portion where we discover the marriage was annuled."

    Re-read again. This time with an open mind.

    Hint: He didn't get his GC through his "first" marriage. INS is moaning becuase he didn't list his first marriage in the prior marriages column, he probably didn't for the reason you mention.

    Anyway, unless you get a handle, I have a problem responding to your posts. Undoubtedly R. Lawson will defend his own point. So, I will leave it to him. BTW, RL< what happened to Middle Ground?
  9. R. Lawson's Avatar
    "Undoubtedly R. Lawson will defend his own point. So, I will leave it to him. BTW, RL< what happened to Middle Ground?"

    I personally don't care if he had (minor) discrepancies regarding his immigration documents. He is serving our country and I believe we should overlook human errors and reward the obvious qualities this individual has.

    Regarding the MG alias, I have no problem posting in defense of people serving our country under my real name. I am very much against GWB's decisions to go to war, but I am a strong supporter of our military members.

    I hope that the ILW and related organizations go to this soldier's aid, if they haven't already. I would send in money to his defense fund.
  10. 's Avatar
    "Hint: He didn't get his GC through his "first" marriage. INS is moaning becuase he didn't list his first marriage in the prior marriages column, he probably didn't for the reason you mention."

    That's your take on it. If you read closer you'll find INS thinks he used the marriage to get into the country. So something doesn't quite gel here. Without knowing the full facts we can't really say who's in the right here.

    Regardless, this illustrates quite well the underlying debate around whether past faults should be overridden by future good behavior. I have to give credit to the INS for showing the courage to go after someone employed by the army :-).
  11. R. Lawson's Avatar
    "Regardless, this illustrates quite well the underlying debate around whether past faults should be overridden by future good behavior. "

    I agree. I'm not sure there was a fault here by the soldier, but I think in general we should reward good behavior. One way to do that is to forgive bad behavior.

    As someone on the middle ground here (on the general issue of immigration) I think we should have the debate as to who we want as immigrants in this country. We can't deport everyone, so who do we want to stay? Who do want to focus deportation efforts on?

    Some people say that we should open borders - everyone is welcome. Some people say that we should close the borders - cut off immigration. Most people are probably like me and somewhere in the middle. We appreciate immigrants, are troubled by illegal immigration (and employment), and want a more altruistic approach to immigration. In short - the good of the nation is more important that the good of the corporation.

    The debate should be focused on who we want (what type of people) and how many we want. People who say that immigrants don't help our country are wrong. People that say immigrants don't harm our country are also wrong. There are cases of both. Our goal should be to find out how to create an immigration system that produces the most good. I think the current system has failed us in many ways.
  12. 's Avatar
    "I personally don't care if he had (minor) discrepancies regarding his immigration documents. He is serving our country and I believe we should overlook human errors and reward the obvious qualities this individual has."

    Surely. That is probably what will happen if the oversight is found to be harmless. The army may also be able to make a case in the national interest as well. Unfortunately this is a good example of how far things have to go in today's vitiated immigration system before the right thing happens.
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