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Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy

DEPORTED MOM COULD COME BACK AS MEXICAN DIPLOMAT

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This story will no doubt be giving some of the anti-immigrant folks heartburn. The Mexican government is apparently in talks with the US State Department regarding sending as a diplomat Elvira Arellano, the mother who sought sanctuary in a Chicago church and who was arrested, deported and separated from her eight year old US citizen son after she emerged more than a year after going in to the church.

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Comments

  1. Anonymous's Avatar
    I doubt the State Department is going to go for that. Your own views on immigration aside, if you were in the State Department would you admit someone who would be a headache for the Administration?

    Actually, if I were in the pro-amnesty crowd I wouldn't want her as an ambasador because she is now a political lightning rod. She would just invigorate the anti-immigrants.

    It's nice being in the middle, knowing that both extremes are wrong on the issue of immigration.
  2. Greg Siskind's Avatar
    You can't reject a diplomat because you don't like their views.
  3. Anonymous's Avatar
    But, technically she committed a crime - I'm not sure if charges are dropped when a person is deported (as she was) or how that works. She was also ordered not to re-enter the country.

    I suspect she will get rejected on legal grounds. Have there been people ordered out of the country but later permitted back in as diplomats?

    Slightly different situation, but imagine if the Panamanian congressman wanted on murder charges here were to try the same thing.
  4. Greg Siskind's Avatar
    She committed a civil offense I believe, not a criminal offense. And there are numerous examples of diplomats who commit civil offenses. The interesting question is whether the diplomatic visa category automatically exempts someone from the non-security grounds of exclusion. I don't know the answer without researching that obscure question.
  5. Anon's Avatar
    Just check out the comments after the story. The whole thing is already causing a pretty serious backlash. People get their kicks especially from quoting her how she doesn't want a visa and how the Mexican president should not have to seek permission to send people North of the Mexican border. This whole thing was a pretty bad idea and is seriously hurting the immigrants' cause.
  6. Another voice's Avatar
    I support all Immigrants regardless of their status however on this one this lady took it upon hers self to defy the authorities and had to pay the price by been deported. I think she should **** her wounds and move on with her life back home. Otherwise she is going to be used as the posterchild by the antis on what is wrong with pro-immigration reform she will do more harm than good to all immigrants.
  7. Another voice's Avatar
    I think a presidential pardon and a private bill may work better for this lady. But she is making Mexico out to be Darfur like no one can live there or something.
  8. anon's Avatar
    Can you blame these people that they become Americans at heart so fast. Americans can't live in Mexico. Period.
  9. Another voice's Avatar
    She had a dream like all immigrants that want to come to the US but unfortunatly due to the Immigration policy she was not able to come here legally and she got caught. I am sorry to see her victim to the broken system but realistically I see no chance for her to return to the US legally.
  10. Anonymous's Avatar
    "The interesting question is whether the diplomatic visa category automatically exempts someone from the non-security grounds of exclusion."

    Do we let members of Hamas into the country since they now represent the Palestinian govt - or what's left of it? I doubt any of them would pass a security check. Isn't Hamas on the list of terrorist groups?
  11. Greg Siskind's Avatar
    Anon - Did you not see the word "non-security"?
  12. Legal and waiting's Avatar
    "Americans can't live in Mexico. Period."

    Yet, they do. Thousands of Americans live in Mexico, Panama, Costa Rica, Europe... There is NOTHING worng with it. It's like Bill Maher monologue - 'How do you know America is the best? Have you been to other countries?'... "Freedom fries" kind of pseudo-patriotism.
  13. Limbo's Avatar
    What could the Mexican government hope to gain from such an action? I just don't get it. This will just reinforce the perception that they are encouraging their citizens to flout American immigration law.
  14. Another voice's Avatar
    I agree with Limbo Mexican government will be weakening its position to work on Immigration reform by making this lady a diplomat and it would give an impression that anybody can be a diplomat regardless of professional credentials. Like I said before this lady needs to **** her wounds and move on!!
  15. Calouste's Avatar
    >> You can't reject a diplomat because you don't like their views.

    Not too sure about that. Definitely the host nation (in this case the US) grants diplomatic status to the diplomat, and can withdraw it as well, usually combined with expelling the person in question from the country. I always had the impression that the granting and revoking of diplomatic status was solely at the discretion of the host nation's government and that it isn't really bound by any laws, but only limited by the (un)willingness of both countries to cause diplomatic incidents and damage relations with each other and possibly other nations.
  16. 's Avatar
    Any alien illegally present in the U.S. for longer than 180 days will automatically trigger a 10-year ban from returning to this country.
  17. Anonymous's Avatar
    "Anon - Did you not see the word "non-security"?"

    Ah, didn't read correctly.

    It's tough to see how she would be a security threat - more of a political headache. Nobody in politics - in either party - are chomping at the bit to address this issue. Well, unless you are Tancredo or Gutierez (for opposite sides).

    If I were a politician I'd avoid immigration issues like the plaugue. No matter which side you take, you are going to polarize yourself. It's a no-win situation.
  18. Anon's Avatar
    Let's focus on the Gomez boys and forget about this issue. At least compared to her, they're the pinnacle of achievement.
  19. Another voice's Avatar
    I am sure there are a lot of Gomez examples out there yet you do not see them getting a special treatment. I am glad that somebody is helping them but this just shows the need for Dream Act or CIR.
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