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Letters of the Week: Mar 12 - Mar 16

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  1. jkwolstenholme 's Avatar
    Immigration laws need to be reformed. I am not one to complain about a situation without offering some sort of solution.


    1. Illegal immigrants currently residing in the United States must be allowed to come out of the shadows. Those who are here without any criminal record would relish that opportunity. Those immigrants with criminal background or intent will not and will ultimately be apprehended and dealt with accordingly.

    2. Close the borders. Announce globally that on such a date anyone entering the United States illegally will not or ever be given the right to live in the United States and if caught will be subjected to immediate deportation

    3. Deal with each illegal immigrant individually. Immigration lawyers ought to love this one.

    4. Offer sponsorship programs for spouses, family and potential employers of these individuals.

    5. Have each illegal pay a fine of $7,500.00. This would be approximately 90 million dollars of revenue. Enough, I would think, to draft up the laws to deal with this new immigration reform.

    6. Give credits to those illegal immigrants who can speak English, who have paid taxes, and those who have higher education and skills.

    7. Provide community service options for the poorer immigrants.

    It is a documented fact that if immigrants whether illegal or legal are allowed to become part of the social/economic fabric of this country they will assimilate into the culture. Otherwise, they are forced to go underground.

    In this depressed economy the paper work to implement this alone would provide jobs for thousands. Of course, the money to pay for these jobs would be coming from the illegal aliens themselves.

    I would love to hear your response to my position. Please take some time to consider my points carefully. I am not interested in more rhetoric or current social clich?s. I am interested in well considered criticism with alternate solutions.


  2. Roger & Lynn Bloxham 's Avatar
    Excellent commentary. They are exhibiting bravery, courage and a sense of morality that to my mind is very similar to those who, long ago, refused to return run away slaves. I know some will say it is not an accurate analogy, but there are more similarities than differences. These people are definitely to be supported and admired for their efforts. Also, thanks to you for highlighting them.

    The measure of a person's value of liberty is not how much liberty one desires for oneself, but how much liberty one is willing to allow others.
  3. Jay McTyier 's Avatar
    I've thought a couple of days about Mr. Wolstenholme's proposed solutions to immigration reform and have these comments.

    As always in these discussions, the devil is in the details; and the reality that any new legislation will be enacted in the context of the current state of immigration jurisprudence. Unless Congress speaks clearly and says "by this enactment, we intend to overrule by legislation all past federal precedents that have interprepted the immigration law; and to replace the old immigration code with this new code," there will always be questions about whether the "new law" overruled the old precedent set by the BIA or the Courts of Appeal.

    On Wolstenholme's first point regarding permitting only those undocumented without "criminal backgrounds" to regularize their status, what constitutes a criminal background? One misdemeanor conviction by plea? Our current law defines, if loosely, the kinds of criminal activity that results in immigration consequences, and the courts have filled in the missing pieces cases by case. Do we keep that set of rules or or write new ones? Where do we draw the line? Three misdemeanors of a non-violent nature get a pass, but a single conviction for a sexual offense involving a minor, even when the minor was your girlfriend, means permanent banishment?

    Regarding his second point of closing the borders and instituting "immediate deportation," does his proposal include overriding the Supreme Court precedents that have intepreted the Constitution to say that immigrants are entitled to "due process" and that due process means notice and a meaningful opportunity to be heard? The concern there is if Congress can write laws that abrogate established constitutional rights for one group and it sticks, it emboldens them to write laws that abrogate constitutional rights for others--maybe some of yours, Mr. Wolstenholme, like your right to be free of illegal search and seizure.

    I do heartily agree with his point of giving special consideration for people who have learned English (both oral and written), have higher education and/or special skills, and have paid taxes. Such a scheme would mirror the Canadian immigration policy, which shows a preference for people who either have some cultural affinity with the host country and/or offer a potential contribution to the host economy, beyond just manual labor, and perhaps a relative who happens to live there.

    I am assuming for a moment that Mr. Wolstenholme is just a concerned citizen, not an attorney or lobbyist; and I applaud him, and encourage all concerned citizens to follow his lead, in thinking critically about what they want in an immigration policy, beyond such highly personalized issues as "I wish my brother/mother/sister/friend could come be with me in the U.S." Although not fully fleshed out, his proposal does show he is thinking about priorities that could be enacted into law, and not just whining.

  4. R. Yang's Avatar
    Re : Mr. Wolstenholme' letter about Immigration Reform

    Before reforming immigration, we must reform our welfare system that is easily been abused by anyone including the US citizens who don't deserve the benefits. It's an outrage for healthy able bodied persons to get handouts from tax payers money. Recently we read about a million dollar lottery winner that still enjoy her food stamp benefits without shame and an owner of million dollar beach front property in the state of WA enjoying the food stamp also. How comes on Earth and America these rich people can have no shame to abuse our welfare system ?

    Our immigration laws can be enforced humanely, fairly and orderly. Those who don't have status and no criminal records should be able to obtain earned legal status with certain conditions :

    1. Pay fine at least $ 2,500 or doing community service equal to that amount.
    2. Pay back income taxes for years they have lived and worked here or pay in lump sump assumption of tax of $ 1000/year to the IRS.
    3. They must sign an affidavit that they will waive all pub-
    lic welfare benefits until they become US citizens and they enroll to obtain health insurance for themselves and the pre condition to earn permanent residency later.
    4. They must pass TOEFL test within one year of obtaining the new legal status and they must pay out of pocket of all the expenses to learn English and participate in the test.
    5. Permanent Residency will be given after 6 years of spotless
    productive years by paying taxes each year and never commit any crimes and asking welfare benefits.
    6. This legalization applies also to those who have already
    pursued all legal avenues and exhausted them. It's not fair for those who have spent money and efforts in the court of laws to be single out of this benefits while ones who jump the border will enjoy them.
    7. We will make employers to pay the cost of immediate repatriation of their foreign workers caught working without permits with fine at least $ 5,000 per person with $ 2000 will go to one way plane ticket to overseas for the employee and $ 1,000 allowance for the undocumented worker paid for by their ex boss. $ 2,000 will be split between federal and local governments for the cost of enforcement of the labor and immigration laws. Employees won't be jailed nor harassed at all. There is 90 days time frame for them to get their plane tickets for by their former bosses plus $ 1,000 cash allowance for them to go back voluntarily. There won't be 3 or 10 years bar for anyone, because it's not necessary. We will make the employers to be fully responsible for their actions and decisions. Foreigners are still welcomed here despite their past immigration violations because we are sure there's no further abuses in the system by ensuring employers to comply with our labor and immigration laws robustly and diligently.

    8. No jail time, no pink uniforms, no harassment on foreigners whatsoever. Just fine the bosses who try to cheat the laws.
    9. We must have a temporary workers program to let foreigners to fill in any jobs locals don't fill. Temporary means temporary, foreign workers can't sponsor their family members to come here nor to obtain permanent status unless they show better merits to get it.
  5. Roger W. Bloxham & Lynn Atherton-Bloxham 's Avatar
    So well said! But how can people not see that this is so?
    The measure of a person's value of liberty is not how much liberty one desires for oneself, but how much liberty one is willing to allow others.
  6.  Honza Prchal 's Avatar
    Public Schools Sell Empty Classroom Seats Abroad

    http://www.ncpa.org/sub/dpd/index.php?Article_ID=21699&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DPD
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