ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
© 1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

Jason Dzubow on Political Asylum

New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S.

Rating: 2 votes, 3.00 average.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon last week signed into law a new provision meant to bring Mexican asylum law in line with international standards.  Fox News Latino reports that the law was drafted taking into account the model legislation from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.


 


Cantinflas Until recently, Mexican asylum law was enforced by this guy.

"From now on," President Calderon said, "Mexico will consider applications for refugee status from any person who cites a fear of being persecuted for his race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion."  Gender persecution will also be considered legitimate grounds for an asylum claim, he said.  Officially recognized refugees will have a right to work and to access health care and education.


UNHCR hailed the move:


Mexico has long been a signatory of the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol and the country has a history of protecting asylum-seekers and refugees.  But, until now, Mexico lacked a specific legal framework for dealing with refugees as previous laws did not comply with international standards.


This law conforms to such standards.  It includes important principles such as non-refoulement (non forced returns); non-discrimination; no penalty for irregular entry; family unity; best interests of the child; and confidentiality.


If-and it is a big if-the new law is properly implemented, it could have an impact on the flow of asylum seekers into the U.S. via our Southern border.  As I've discussed in this blog previously, African, Chinese, and other asylum seekers enter the United States at the Mexican border and then file for asylum in the U.S.  If these people pass through Mexico without requesting asylum, it could negatively impact their chances for success in the United States (for example, they might be deemed less credible).  If they request asylum in Mexico, and their request is granted, they would be ineligible for asylum in the U.S., as they would be "firmly resettled" in Mexico for purposes of the immigration law. 


In addition, the U.S. currently has a "safe third-country" agreement with Canada, meaning that people denied asylum in Canada cannot apply for asylum here, and vice versa (at least that is how the agreement is supposed to work).  If the Mexican asylum law meets international standards, perhaps we will enter into such an agreement with Mexico.  This would further reduce the possibility for asylum seekers to pass through Mexico and then seek asylum in the United States.


The impact of the Mexican law on the flow of asylum seekers into the United States will depend on how effectively the new law is implemented.  Given the Mexican government's current challenges, I'm a bit skeptical of its ability to live up to the high standards it has set for itself.  I suppose we'll have to wait and see.


Originally posted on the Asylumist: www.Asylumist.com.

Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to Facebook Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to Twitter Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to Google Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to StumbleUpon Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to Reddit Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to Digg Submit "New Asylum Law in Mexico Could Reduce the Flow of Refugees to the U.S." to del.icio.us

Tags: None Add / Edit Tags

Comments

Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: