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Jason Dzubow on Political Asylum

Jesus Christ, Refugee

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Refugees--especially Muslim refugees--are big news these days. Are they a threat? Should we ban them from our country? Can they ever integrate into American society?
"A refugee from Palestine with his wife and child? They must be terrorists!"

Despite our collective amnesia on this point, the fact is, we've been asking these same questions about refugees for at least a hundred years. And I suspect that people around the world have been asking such questions ever since the first stranger arrived at a door seeking shelter. Since it's almost Christmas, I thought it might be a good time to look back at one of the world's oldest refugee stories--of Joseph, Mary, and Jesus, who fled from Palestine to Egypt.

Mathew tells us that around the time of Jesus's birth, three wise men came from the East. They went to King Herod and asked, "Where is he that is born King of the Jews?" Herod was "troubled" by the question. Who was this child who was king of the Jews, and thus a threat to Herod's throne?

Herod consulted his prophets, who predicted that the baby would be found in Bethlehem. The wily king told the three wise men. He also ordered the men to tell him when they found Jesus, so he (Herod) could "worship" the new king. Of course, this was a ploy--Herod wanted to find Jesus in order to kill him and eliminate the threat to his throne. The wise men (being wise) understood Herod's plan. They found Jesus, but never told the king.


Because the wise men foiled his plan, Herod was unable to locate the newborn Jesus. He still wanted to protect himself from the perceived threat, so he ordered all the babies born in Bethlehem murdered. This event became known as the Massacre of the Innocents.


Luckily for Jesus and his family, an angel came to his father Joseph and warned him about the danger. Joseph took the family and fled to Egypt, where they received asylum. The family remained in Egypt until Herod died a few years later. They then moved to a different part of Palestine (Nazareth), to avoid living under the rule of Herod's son, who was no better
than his father.


The Book of Mathew contains nothing about Jesus's time in Egypt, but there are many interesting Coptic traditions associated with this period (the Coptic church originated in Egypt). In many parts of Egypt, it is possible to visit places where Jesus and his family sojourned. There are churches and other holy sites, like healing springs, caves, and sacred trees. One tree was possessed by an evil spirit, but when Jesus approached, the spirit fled. The tree then bent down to worship him.


Another ancient story says that as Jesus and his family entered Heliopolis, "the noise of a rushing mighty wind was heard, the earth trembled [and] the idols crashed from their pedestals."


There is also a legend about how the Holy Family was traveling down the Nile River in a boat. At one point, they were sailing past a mountain when a large boulder appeared ready to fall on their boat. Jesus extended his hand and prevented the boulder from falling. The imprint of his hand appeared on the rock.


Another story tells of two robbers who surprised Jesus's family on the road and tried to steal Joseph's donkey. One of the robbers saw the baby Jesus and was astonished by his unusual beauty. He said, "If God were to take upon Himself the flesh of man, He would not be more beautiful than this child!" The robber then ordered his companions to take nothing from the travelers. Filled with gratitude toward this generous robber, Mary told him, "Know that this child will repay you because you protected him today." Thirty-three years later, this same thief hung on the cross for his crimes, crucified on the right side of Jesus's cross. His name was Dismas. On the cross, he repented for all the evil of his life and declared that Jesus was innocent and wrongly crucified. The Gospel of Luke records that Dismas was the wise thief. The man who spared Jesus in his childhood was granted entry into paradise.


Coptic tradition holds that "Egyptian conversion to Christianity two thousand years ago can be attributed to the historic visit of the Christ Child" and that "Egypt was chosen by God as a place of refuge; truly the people abiding there were richly blessed." The people of Egypt were blessed because they offered refuge to Jesus and his family when they fled persecution. Perhaps this should remind us of our moral responsibility to help one another, and that the helper often receives as much (or more) of a benefit than the person who is helped.

Originally posted on the Asylumist: www.Asylumist.com.

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