ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

View RSS Feed

Matthew Kolken on Deportation And Removal

Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis

Rate this Entry
The International Crisis Group (ICG) has issued a report entitled Easy Prey: Criminal Violence and Central American Migration. The report determined that the strategy employed by Mexico and the U.S. to deport waves of people has been ineffective to stop refugees from Central Americans from "fleeing endemic poverty" and "epidemic violence". They conclude that building a wall will merely deepen the humanitarian crisis while strengthening criminal networks that have turned Central America into a "criminal battleground".

From the executive summary:

Massive deportations from Mexico and the U.S. have failed to stem the tide of Central Americans fleeing endemic poverty combined with epidemic violence. Stepped up enforcement has diverted undocumented migration into more costly, circuitous and dangerous channels. Criminal gangs and the corrupt officials who enable them are the beneficiaries of a policy that forces desperate people to pay increasing sums to avoid detention, extortion or kidnapping. Beefed-up border control inadvertently fuels human smuggling and fortifies criminal gangs that increasingly control that industry. Governments must guarantee those fleeing violence the opportunity to seek asylum through fair, efficient procedures, while launching a major regional effort to provide security and economic opportunity in home countries. Central American leaders, especially in the northern triangle of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, must in turn address chronic insecurity more effectively while monitoring and assisting those deported, especially children and adolescents, so they have an option other than fleeing again.

Click here to read the entire report.

Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to Facebook Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to Twitter Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to Google Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to StumbleUpon Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to Reddit Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to Digg Submit "Report: Mass Deportations Have Fueled a Humanitarian Crisis" to del.icio.us

Updated 07-28-2016 at 07:52 AM by MKolken

Comments

  1. Nolan Rappaport's Avatar
    So, Matthew, what do you suggest, an open border? Do you think we can solve the world's problems by bringing everyone to the United States?
  2. Nolan Rappaport's Avatar
    "Governments must guarantee those fleeing violence the opportunity to seek asylum through fair, efficient procedures, while launching a major regional effort to provide security and economic opportunity in home countries. Central American leaders, especially in the northern triangle of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, must in turn address chronic insecurity more effectively while monitoring and assisting those deported, especially children and adolescents, so they have an option other than fleeing again."

    I shouldn't have ignored your reference to asylum hearings. I would like everyone who wants asylum to be able to appear before an immigration judge, but it simply isn't possible. A recent TRAC report says that, Despite the addition of new judges, the number of cases awaiting resolution before the Immigration Courts climbed to a new all-time high of 496,704 as of the end of June 2016. It also says that, "Nearly a third (29%) of the backlog consists of priority cases involving either unaccompanied children or women with children." That's an average of 1,819 cases for each of the 273 judges now on the bench. http://trac.syr.edu/immigration/reports/429/

    If you have a solution, how much would it cost? We have a national debt that is approaching $20 trillions already. I do think we should do more to help Central American leaders, but I don't know what effective measures are available or how much they would cost either.
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: