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Greg Siskind on Immigration Law and Policy

AP Drops "Illegal Immigrant" Term

Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.

Two years ago I posted the news that the Society of Professional Journalists passed a resolution urging all journalists to stop using the term "Illegal immigrant." The Associated Press finally announced today it would stop. Other organizations like the NY Times still are using the term, though they are said to be reviewing the policy now.


Here is part of the AP's explanation:


The Stylebook no longer sanctions the term
"illegal immigrant" or the use of "illegal" to describe a person.
Instead, it tells users that "illegal" should describe only an action,
such as living in or immigrating to a country illegally.


Why did we make the change?


The discussions on this topic have been
wide-ranging and include many people from many walks of life. (Earlier,
they led us to reject descriptions such as "undocumented," despite
ardent support from some quarters, because it is not precise. A person
may have plenty of documents, just not the ones required for legal
residence.)


 



So how should AP reporters write about these immigrants? Here's what the AP manual now says on the topic:


illegal immigration Entering or residing in a country in violation of civil or criminal law. Except in direct quotes essential to the story, use illegal only to refer to an action, not a person: illegal immigration, but not illegal immigrant. Acceptable variations include living in or entering a country illegally or without legal permission.


Except in direct quotations, do not use the terms illegal alien, an illegal, illegals or undocumented.


Do not describe people as violating immigration laws without attribution.


Specify wherever possible how someone
entered the country illegally and from where. Crossed the border?
Overstayed a visa? What nationality?


People who were brought into the country
as children should not be described as having immigrated illegally. For
people granted a temporary right to remain in the U.S. under the
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, use temporary resident status, with details on the program lower in the story.





I've used the term "illegally present immigrant" over the years as I think it is a more accurate description, but I am always open to change if a better term is coined.

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Comments

  1. Jack's Avatar
    What a mess and I must have missed the part where they give a preferred term other than things like "living in a country without legal permission." Seriously? How do incorporate that into a story? Greg or I could have saved them the trouble. Ever heard of "present" as an adjective? "Present" instead of "living in a country".

    It's not that complicated. The main term to avoid is "illegal" (noun). It's an adjective. I prefer "alien" to "immigrant" because not all aliens are immigrants in terms of permanence.

    When you use "illegal" to qualify the noun alien or immigrant, I think it's clear enough that immigration status is what the adjective refers to but if you want to be as clear as possible, you can simply add "present" between legal/illegal or lawful/unlawful and your preferred noun (immigrant, alien, etc.) Some people even have an issue with "illegal" as an adjective. Fine, "unlawful" is the same thing anyway but I suspect they wouldn't approve that either. Greg's use of "illegal" would offend the "Drop the I-word" crowd but let's face it--they are not exactly reasonable people or lacking an agenda. They do approve a few terms, e.g., "aspiring citizen".
  2. CIR2013's Avatar
    JACK IN THE BOX NEEDS TO THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX HAHAHAHA
  3. George Chell's Avatar
    JACK AND JILL WENT UP THE CAPITOL HILL
    ON REFORM TO THROW COLD WATER
    BUT JACK WAS PUSHED DOWN AND BROKE HIS CROWN
    AND JILL CAME TUMBLING AFTER.
  4. George Chell's Avatar
    I am very certain that immigrants are not responsible for low wages in this profession, lower than that of ag workers...

    http://abc.go.com/watch/2020/SH559026/VDKA0_xjlbboro/2020-323-vacation-confidential
  5. USC's Avatar
    "I prefer "alien" to "immigrant" because not all aliens are immigrants in terms of permanence."

    Alien is for those who are from outer space but if the term is to be used it should be reserved for the antis because they hold beliefs that are alien and offesive to all right thinking persons.


    How about using the term "migrant" to describe those who came illegally and "immigrant" to those who came here legally?
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